August 1

Six Places to Take Spa and UltraRestorative Yoga in Boston

first_img Sign up for Health & Wellness newsletters. Everything you need to stay healthy and fit.* 2/17/2017, 3:07 p.m. Read all about the latest gym openings, healthy events, and fitness trends in our twice weekly Wellness newsletter. Six Places to Take Spa and Ultra-Restorative Yoga in Boston Give yourself a much-needed break. 202center_img A class at JP Centre Yoga/Photo providedThere’s a subtle change afoot in the fitness community. No longer is the name of the game pushing yourself as hard as you can, as often as you can. More and more studios and practitioners are recognizing the need for rest and recovery, and for countering hardcore classes with good old TLC.One harbinger of this trend is the emergence of ultra-luxurious yoga classes, prioritizing restorative poses and hands-on assists over power flows. Get ready to relax at these six spots.1. Akasha StudioEase into the weekend at this Roslindale studio. Akasha offers Spa Yoga, a trademarked style that engages all five senses with gentle poses, candlelight, aromatherapy, plenty of hands-on assists, and guided meditation. Take it on Thursday evenings at 7:30 p.m.$17 drop-in. 20 Birch St., Roslindale, akashastudiojp.com.2. The Breathing RoomAt her monthly, two-hour Self Love workshops, instructor Caitlin Green uses restorative yoga, meditation, reiki, and supported trigger point release to help yogis relax entirely.$35. The Breathing Room, 12 Arrow St., Cambridge, breathingroomboston.com.3. C-Town StudioThis Charlestown studio also offers 75-minute Spa Yoga classes, sometimes even featuring chocolate. It’s offered Monday evenings at 6:30 p.m.$15 drop-in. 314 Main St., Charlestown, charlestownyoga.com.4. JP Centre YogaThis Jamaica Plain studio regularly offers special two-hour restorative yoga workshops. These events go beyond typical gentle classes to include hands-on adjustments from a team of assistants, Thai massage, and energy-based therapies.$40. 670 Centre St., Jamaica Plain, jpcentreyoga.com.5. Shawmut YogaBeat the Tuesday slump with a mind, body, and soul healing class at this South End spot. Its Spa Yoga classes are offered Tuesdays at 7:15 p.m.$18 drop-in. 280 Shawmut Ave., Boston, shawmutyoga.com.6. Studio UStudio U sometimes offers Spa Yoga workshops at both its Boston and Newton locations. If you’re lucky, they’re even followed by champagne and other treats.$30. 1065 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, and 26 Ossipee Road, Newton, studiouboston.com. Print By Jamie Ducharme· last_img read more

August 1

Theres a Sinking Yellow House on the Greenway

first_img Photo courtesy of Rose Kennedy Greenway ConservancyIf you’ve taken a stroll down the Rose Kennedy Greenway this week, you may have noticed a new, brightly colored structure poking out from the grassy expanse. A lopsided yellow house, which, depending on your perspective, could be sinking into the ground or rising up from it, has been built in the space between Pearl and Oliver Streets.The dwelling isn’t a solution to the city’s shrinking housing inventory—rather, it’s one of three new public art installations to grace the Greenway this spring. Called “The Meeting House,” the yellow cottage is modeled after a New England Quaker meetinghouse. It was dreamed up by artist Mark Reigelman, who’s aiming to make a statement about the built environment. The house and its accompanying mini house are meant to make viewers ponder the multiple layers of history that created Boston’s unique landscape.“The sculpture references two significant parts of New England history: the small, house-like structure is a reminder of the thousands of displaced residents and demolished homes that resulted from the city’s elevated highway infrastructure project,” reads Reigelman’s artist statement. The larger house is modeled after the oldest surviving Quaker meetinghouse in Massachusetts: the Pembroke Friends Meeting House.To build it, Reigelman created plans for a 14-foot version of the historic Pembroke building, then titled it at a 20-degree angle. He transported more than 20 parts to the Greenway this week, and pieced the house together using authentic woodworking techniques. It’s made of Eastern white cedar, birch plywood, galvanized metal, Plexiglass, steel, cast concrete, and acrylic resin coating. Sign up for Home & Property newsletters. Design, real estate, and pretty things for living.* By Madeline Bilis· 202 Print There’s a Sinking Yellow House on the Greenway The new public art installation references New England’s history. 5/11/2017, 11:35 a.m. Sign up for our weekly home and property newsletter, featuring homes for sale, neighborhood happenings, and more. The installation also makes a statement about community ideals, since traditional meetinghouses acted as community centers where members could discuss local issues, conduct religious worship, and engage in town business.“The Meeting House intends to mimic these ideals, highlighting the potential for civic structures to act as gathering points where passersby can explore, question and interact, and acting as a reminder of the essentialness of social interaction and civic discourse,” continues Reigelman in his statement.The precariously perched example of colonial architecture was completed on Wednesday. It’s a part of the Greenway’s Playful Perspectives series, which seeks to inject playfulness and curiosity into everyday life. Two other works will debut over the next three months as part of the series: an optical illusion room by Meredith James called “Far from this setting in which we now find ourselves,” and 3D paintings on two-dimensional surfaces by Aakash Nihalani.In a statement, the Greenway’s public art curator, Lucas Cowan, said the works will monumentalize the mundane. “For 2017, we’ve sought to invite both the viewer and the artwork to interact with one another and have an experience that’s altogether perspective-altering,” he said.Photo by Mark Reigalmanlast_img read more