December 31

Goldman Sachs: Coal construction in Western Europe is over

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Bloomberg:Western Europe may already have built its last coal power plant as governments everywhere crack down on greenhouse-gas pollution.That’s the view of Gonzalo Garcia, the global co-head of natural resources at Goldman Sachs Group Inc. While U.S. President Donald Trump is seeking to revive the industry, politicians across Europe are working hard to stop using the dirtiest fossil fuel.German Chancellor Angela Merkel has named a panel of lawmakers from the main political parties to consider when the nation can close its last coal plant. The U.K. has vowed to do so by 2025. And financiers, notably Standard Chartered Plc earlier this week, are getting cold feet about writing loans for new coal plants.“I personally believe that we’re not going to see a new coal plant being built in western Europe ever again,” Garcia said at a conference in Oslo on Wednesday. “It will be very challenging in most OECD countries to build new coal plants. It’s going to become increasingly expensive.”The coal plants that remain open are becoming more expensive to run. Coal for delivery in Rotterdam is approaching $100 a ton, its highest in five years, and the cost of carbon emissions allowances is near the most it’s been in a decade.“It’s going to become increasingly more controversial to keep burning coal,” Garcia said. “So there’s no question the big loser is going to be coal.”More: Goldman says Europe may have built its last coal power plant Goldman Sachs: Coal construction in Western Europe is overlast_img read more

December 31

National Grid says zero-carbon generation will top coal, gas in U.K. in 2019

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Reuters:Britain, the birthplace of coal power, is set this year to use more electricity from zero-carbon sources such as wind, solar and nuclear than from fossil fuel plants for the first time, the country’s National Grid said on Friday.Britain was home to the world’s first coal-fueled power plant in the 1880s, and coal was its dominant electricity source and a major economic driver for the next century. But last week it became the first G7 country to commit to reach net-zero emissions by 2050, a target requiring a big increase in low-carbon power, and an even steeper reduction in fossil fuel use.“The incredible progress that Britain has made in the past 10 years means we can now say 2019 will be the year zero-carbon power beats fossil fuel fired generation for the first time,” National Grid CEO John Pettigrew said.Data from National Grid shows low-carbon power generation contributed around 48% of Britain’s electricity in the first five months of 2019 while fossil fuels such as coal and gas-fired plants contributed around 47%. The rest comes from biomass and storage.The transition has been largely due to a huge increase in Britain’s wind power capacity, with wind contributing almost a fifth of the country’s power in the first five months of 2019, up from just 1% in 2009.The increase in zero-carbon power marks a huge shift from a decade ago when coal and gas plants provided around three-quarters of the country’s electricity. Britain plans to phase out all coal-fired power generation by 2025 and further cuts in greenhouse emissions will be vital if the country is to meet the net-zero target, the government’s climate advisers have said.More: Clean power to overtake fossil fuels in Britain in 2019 National Grid says zero-carbon generation will top coal, gas in U.K. in 2019last_img read more

December 31

Wood Mackenzie: Global wind turbine supply chain could hit $600 billion annually by 2028

first_imgWood Mackenzie: Global wind turbine supply chain could hit $600 billion annually by 2028 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Smart Energy:The global wind turbine supply chain is expected to generate up to $600 billion per annum between 2020 and 2028, according to a new study released by Wood Mackenzie.Despite the COVID-19 pandemic which is pressing near-term hurdles for the wind energy industry, the market is expected to record 8% growth during the forecast period compared to 2019.The study states that U.S. PTC phaseout post-2020 will spur demand for nearly 5,000 wind towers in 2020, compelling turbine OEMs to increase tower imports into the U.S. despite anti-dumping duties.Wood Mackenzie says higher average turbine prices and a 20% growth in offshore demand reflect a 37% uptick in supply chain potential, representing a cumulative value of $222 billion by 2028. Strategic capital components, such as blades and towers, present a $25 billion cumulative opportunity by themselves.Shashi Barla, a principal analyst with Wood Mackenzie, said: “A rush in installation activity has caused a shortage of blades and bearings. The coronavirus has jeopardised approximately 10-15% of production volumes in China, Spain and Italy. However, Chinese companies resumed production in early March, resulting in a downgrade of only 3GW for 2020 installations.More: Annual revenue for global wind turbine supply chain to hit $600bnlast_img read more

December 30

Birds Heading South

first_imgDear EarthTalk: What are the major issues with protecting migratory birds that groups like the Nature Conservancy are working on? — Lorinda Bennet, Alnuquerque, NMMigratory birds, like other animals, need suitable habitat and food sources to survive. But unlike other animals which stay primarily in one place, migratory birds depend on the availability of food and habitat all along their migration paths, which for some are thousands of miles long. Changing environmental conditions along routes can hinder birds’ ability to survive their often arduous long distance journeys.Some 1,800 of the world’s 10,000 bird species migrate long distances every year. Typically birds fly to the far north in the summer to feed and return south for the winter to breed, but many variations and exceptions exist. The long-distance record holders are Sooty Shearwaters, which migrate 9,000 miles between nesting sites in the Falkland Islands and feeding sites in the North Atlantic Ocean off of Norway.Chief among environmental threats to migratory birds is habitat destruction. Human development of wetlands areas leaves many birds without suitable habitat for stopovers and even wintering sites. Global warming only twists the knife by making usual stopover sites even less hospitable. Biologists see that widespread climate change is already starting to have a negative effect on the timing of migration cycles and breeding patterns, leading to population declines in species already considered threatened. Hunting is another threat to birds which pass over countries without the resources or will to enforce protections. Obstructions such as power lines, wind farms and offshore oil rigs also negatively affect migratory birds.A large number of international treaties and domestic laws provide protection for migratory birds. For example, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918 affirms the U.S. government’s commitment to international conventions protecting migratory birds (and their eggs and nests) passing through Canada, Japan, Mexico and Russia at some point during their annual travels. Upwards of 1,000 different bird species, as listed on the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service’s Migratory Bird Program website, are protected under this Act. A similar treaty called the African-Eurasian Migratory Waterbird Agreement seeks to protect migratory birds along another of the world’s major migratory bird flyways.While governments only do so much to protect migratory birds, private non-profits are working hard—and devoting millions of dollars—to try to take up the slack. One of the leaders in this battle is the Nature Conservancy, which employs hundreds of ornithologists and planners who identify networks of habitats needed by bird species throughout North America, Latin America and the Caribbean and then work to protect these crucial areas for current and future generations of migratory birds. 1 2last_img read more

December 30

Transylvania Epic Recap

first_imgThanks to Vince for this great shot!Well, it’s been about a week and a half since TSE ended and I’ve put blogging low on the list of priorities simply because when you miss a week or work, there’s a ton of catch up!Here is a recap of my feelings for the week that I wrote for Dirt Rag Magazine last week.Stage 4 was my toughest physical day. The trail was super fun at Raystown. I detonated early on and was feeling the deleterious effects from cracking on the road stage the day before! It was 98 and humid that day. The trail was like a roller coaster with a bunch of woops. It was awesome and I didn’t care that I felt slow and tired on my bike. Well, I did care, but it helped to be on an awesome trail. I’d highly recommend checking out that trail if you are ever in the area!Stage 4a was a wheelie contest that I somehow won. It was awesome!! I have never been great at riding wheelies, but 10′ was all I needed to win the jersey!243302_10100277944713463_10223676_53452814_5128665_ophotoThat would be the super-d jersey and my friend’s son, Tanner. He is only 11 years old and rode about half the stages. Look out for this guy in the future of mountain biking!Stage 5 was fun. It was super d stage race! We did 4 different super-Ds. I had fun on all the techy trails and it was surprisingly refreshing to do some all out 15 minute efforts and some balls-out descending!Stage 6 was the toughest day mentally for me. It was the only day I had good legs, but luck was not on my side. My leg suffered a blow from a hidden tree branch sticking out early on in the race. It’s doing much better, but still swollen and little bit painful. I kept shoving ice into my sock during the race to try to keep the swelling down. I also rode 5 miles off course losing about 30 min and I broke my derailleur. That was the toughest day to swallow. I was thankful to have good legs, but it was a bummer to lose so much time on a day where I could have made some headway on my GC placing. 1 2last_img read more

December 30

Hunter Banks Asheville Getaway Giveaway

first_imgEnter to Win a “That’s So Asheville” Weekend Getaway!Hunter Banks presents a weekend getaway in Asheville, North Carolina! Fly fishing, lodging, and brewery tours…it can all be yours!Grand Prize includes:Fly Fishing School for two from Hunter Banks. Expert instruction from professionals (gear supplied); a $250 value.Two night stay at Aloft Asheville at their downtown Asheville location; some restrictions apply.Two tickets from Asheville Brewery Tours for the mobile tour; a $110 value.This contest is now closed! Thanks to all who entered.DON’T FORGET TO ENTER ALL OUR OTHER GREAT GIVEAWAYS!Rules and Regulations: Package must be redeemed within 1 year of winning date. Entries must be received by mail or through the www.blueridgeoutdoors.com contest sign-up page by 12:00 noon EST on October 15th, 2013. One entry per person. One winner per household.  Sweepstakes open only to legal residents of the 48 contiguous United  States and the District of Columbia, who are 18 years of age or older.  Void wherever prohibited by law. Families and employees of Blue Ridge Outdoors Magazine and participating sponsors are not eligible. No liability is assumed for lost, late, incomplete, inaccurate, non-delivered or misdirected mail, or misdirected e-mail, garbled,  mistranscribed, faulty or incomplete telephone transmissions, for technical hardware or software failures of any kind, lost or unavailable  network connection, or failed, incomplete or delayed computer  transmission or any human error which may occur in the receipt of  processing of the entries in this Sweepstakes. By entering the  sweepstakes, entrants agree that Blue Ridge Outdoors Magazine, Hunter Banks, Aloft Asheville, and Asheville Brewery Tours reserve the right to contact entrants multiple times with special information  and offers. Blue Ridge Outdoors Magazine reserves the right, at their  sole discretion, to disqualify any individual who tampers with the entry  process and to cancel, terminate, modify or suspend the Sweepstakes.  Winners agree that Blue Ridge Outdoors Magazine and participating  sponsors, their subsidiaries, affiliates, agents and promotion agencies  shall not be liable for injuries or losses of any kind resulting from  acceptance of or use of prizes. No substitutions or redemption of cash,  or transfer of prize permitted. Any taxes associated with winning any of  the prizes detailed below will be paid by the winner. Winners agree to  allow sponsors to use their name and pictures for purposes of promotion. Sponsors reserve the right to substitute a prize of equal or greater  value. All Federal, State and local laws and regulations apply.  Selection of winner will be chosen at random at the Blue Ridge Outdoors  office on or before October 30th, 6:00 PM EST 2013. Winners will be contacted by  the information they provided in the contest sign-up field and have 7  days to claim their prize before another winner will be picked. Odds of  winning will be determined by the total number of eligible entries received.last_img read more

December 30

Ask the Doc: Ankle Strain vs. Ankle Sprain

first_imgWelcome to our new Ask the Doc feature. We will be posting regular updates from Dr. Sean Cook with questions pertaining to outdoor injuries and basic health and fitness. Up first is a classic trail injury: the ankle sprain. Hey Doc,While skiing last winter I twisted my ankle. At a local ER I was diagnosed with a strained ankle. What is the difference between an ankle strain and sprain?———————————————————First, some basic anatomy: Ligaments are tissues that attach bone to bone whereas tendons are tissue connections between muscle and bone. The foot and ankle are connected by both. Ligamental stretching or tearing is called a sprain whereas the same injury on a tendon is a strain.Over-lifting or excessive usage are two of the most common causes of strain and are not frequently associated with ankle injuries. Sudden rolling of the foot is the cause of most ankle sprains. The amount of damage to ankle ligaments is measured by three increasing grades. Minor amounts of swelling and pain are common to minimally damaged ligaments and are classified as grade I injuries. Inability to bear weight, especially if the affected ankle moves more freely compared to the non-affected ankle, may indicate may indicate a higher grade injury and the need for a formal medical evaluation.Shoes with good ankle support that prevents ankle rolling are recommended whenever climbing or moving on uneven ground.When Sean Cook, M.D., is not tempting fate kayaking the Chattooga River, you can find him practicing infectious disease in Eastern Georgia and South Carolina.last_img read more

December 30

Trail Mix: Robert Ellis

first_imgWith his latest record, The Lights From The Chemical Plant, singer/songwriter Robert Ellis takes his listeners on a game of sonic hopscotch.While there is just enough pedal steel to make you want to declare this a country record, you can’t.  Ellis certainly draws on vintage country sounds on his third release, he also dabbles in bluegrass, jazz, 70s easy listening, and even bossa nova in creating this collection of songs that, at first listen, comes across as entirely too mature, too deep, for a songwriter just 25 years old.Listen a bit more, though, and dig deeper into Ellis’ catalog – just spin 2011’s Photographs a few times – and you realize that Robert Ellis has been a talent in the making, and this latest record establishes Ellis as a leading voice in contemporary Americana.The stories Ellis weaves on this record are just delicious.  “TV Song,” the opening track, marvels at the escape offered by television, while “Chemical Plant,” the track from which the record got its name, has a swelling chorus that sounds almost jubilant while spinning the all too familiar tale of American industrial decay.And who couldn’t relate to “Houston,” a tale of getting out of town and starting over?Ellis also takes a spin around Paul Simon’s “Still Crazy After All These Years” and the results are fantastic.Robert Ellis shares a songwriting credit with Taylor Goldsmith, of Dawes, on “Steady As The Rising Son” and has Grammy winner Jim Lauderdale as a back up vocalist.  Apparently, songwriters in the know already know what type of talent Robert Ellis is.Get your hands on The Lights From The Chemical Plant and you will to.In the meantime, if you want a little taste, take a listen to “Only Lies” on this month’s Trail Mix.  You can also surf over to www.robertellismusic.com for more information on the new record and when Robert Ellis will be swinging through your town.Speaking of, our Asheville friends are in for a treat this weekend.  Robert Ellis, along with special guest T. Hardy Morris, will be dropping by The Grey Eagle on Friday, February 28th, and Trail Mix would like to give you the opportunity to go check out the show for free.This week’s contest is simple – just shoot me an email at [email protected] and put ROBERT ELLIS in the subject line.  I will pick a winner (or maybe even two!!) from all the folks that email by noon on Thursday.last_img read more

December 30

Ass Armor: Protect Your Assets

first_imgSnow is a sly beast. Take one glance at those rolling white hills along the Blue Ridge this season: they could be piles of pillows or huge marshmallow clouds. Soft, comfortable, forgiving. Gentle giants.Nope.That snow is torture. It may look like sweet fairy dust in the air, but it mostly settles on the mountains like just another layer of stone. Sometimes you’ll come across a big powdery patch of delight to sink your chilly limbs into, and for a brief second you might find some comfort. Much icier slopes, though, seem to be more common here in the East.Still, these slopes attract skiers and snowboarders from all over the region for a dose of wintry adrenaline. Experts cruise down Black Diamond peaks without one bump to document the journey, but behind every snow pro stands a stumbling and bumbling beginner who can’t slide five feet down the mountain without a good bit of falling.Introducing Ass Armor, my new saving grace as I struggle through the early stages of snowboarding. After a single afternoon without any padding or protection, my butt was ready to call the whole thing quits. The bruises just weren’t worth the eventual gain.Turns out that Ass Armor Founder Casey Scherr agrees with me. In the midst of her own Ass Armorlearning process, Scherr needed a little extra support to make it all the way through the run with enough stamina left for even one more go. Ass Armor uses D30 XT, the same polymer technology found in many sports and law enforcement protective pieces, to cradle your backside in a layer of shock-absorbing deliverence. It’s like foam, but better: D30 is 40% thinner than comparable foam products, much more flexible and absorbent, and actually comfortable – very unlike strapping a unwieldy foam block to your rump.The D30 XT padding is attached onto a pair of spandex shorts, ranging in size from XS to XL to fit any user. The spandex material is also breathable and moisture-wicking for optimal dryness through sweat or snow. Wear under layers, in between, or right on top to show off your gear.Thanks to Ass Armor, pioneering the slopes just got a whole lot easier. Falling may be inevitable, but there’s no need to turn black and blue. Breathe easy and tumble in style – your assets are safe.last_img read more