June 12

Interview with Genka Shikerova on media freedom in Bulgaria

first_img Bulgaria: RSF condemns refusal to investigate reporter’s violent arrest October 2, 2013 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Interview with Genka Shikerova on media freedom in Bulgaria Related documents Интервю Генка ШикероваPDF – 223.65 KB News Receive email alerts Organisation BulgariaEurope – Central Asia News Follow the news on Bulgaria Help by sharing this information She was interviewed for Reporters Without Borders by Desislava Kyurkchyeva on 23 September. The original version in bulgarian of this interview is attached at the bottom of this page. Any news about the investigation? Police probe into the case but it is impossible to complete the investigation within a week. I have already been interrogated once and it is quite a routine procedure. They are working on the case; however, I have no idea how far they have reached. In this case, have the police offered you protection? Yourself, have you requested protection? The procedure in this case is of a different kind and this is not on the agenda. This way or the other, I don’t want any. I received full support from the TV channel: the News department director offered me to hire a guard but I refused because I do not plan to change my lifestyle because of what happened. Did you receive any calls, messages or threats in whatever form prior to or after the case? Can you relate them in any way to your work, be it such done now or in the past? No, not before that happened, nor thereafter have I received any threats or messages related to this incident, nor do I have any conflict to relate it with. I tried to recall any, since the police asked me the same questions but I cannot find any relation. Could you confirm the reports of several media that you associate the case with your journalistic work? I have definitively not made such a statement. I cannot find a connection between escalation of political tension and this arson. The only Bulgarian media I have spoken to is bTV. The materials are on the website and all the rest is far-fetched interpretation of my words. I cannot and do not want to jump into any conclusions. Are you fearful about your health and that of your relatives? I really want to believe that this is an act of vandalism. I try not to think about it, nor analyse it. This is why I do not let fear permeate my thoughts. This did happen and I hope that the probe will yield results but if that does not happen, I do not plan to become a victim of arson. I suppose you are aware about opinions that related what happened to your interviews with Lyutvi Mestan and Sergei Stanishev. Some qualified them as biting. In this case, I cannot have an opinion because I have no evidence and it would be absurd to lay the blame on anyone.I asked the adequate journalistic questions for this situation, questions which any colleague would have asked and to which he/she would have wanted to get an answer. This is why from a journalistic standpoint; I believe I have done my job. How would you evaluate your work in the morning show of bTV “This morning”? Have you ever felt any pressure? It is clear that the timing is very special in view of the political context in the country. You, personally, have you felt any difference in your work ever since you have been anchoring the morning show? Me, personally, no because I have always had the freedom to ask questions, both as a reporter and as an anchor.Many colleagues refuse to believe it but so far I have never been subject to any pressure. I have indeed not been object of any. I can definitively assert this. Due to the limited number of political shows, the morning show of bTV has an exceptional role in shaping public opinion in the country. It is often an object of criticism. How does this affect your work? This is why it is interesting because it offers a broad platform for comments, analyses and discussions. Anyone is entitled to personal opinion and new media give the opportunity for this opinion to reach out to more people. By now anyone is an expert and understands what journalism is about. For this reason, comments are rife and I find nothing bad about it. In the interview with the leader of the Socialist Party and the Party of European Socialists Sergei Stanishev, he asks you to draw a parallel with the attitude of the former Prime Minister Boiko Borissov to the media. You answered that PRs keep being insistent over the phone. What does this mean? Of course, they call, we hear them on a daily basis and this is normal. It is another issue how often and what we talk about but these are internal matters which are part of everyday life and are not an exception. If one says that pressure has changed since today and yesterday there was none, one will lie. This is an everyday struggle and this is part of the profession. It is another issue to what degree does the journalist succumb, to what degree the person wants to be objective… But if go back to investigative journalism: is it more difficult now to do investigative journalism in Bulgaria than it used to be five years ago? I can give you an answer to this question next year since I do a thesis on this topic. I make observations on all investigative journalism pieces done in recent years at bTV and Nova TV. I want to see what the trends are in terms of the number and type of investigations, as well as to see what was aired in the individual periods. I believe that the conclusions will be curious. This is very intensive work but it is only then when one can assert for sure… too many assertions have been circulated. If you allow me to be a bit more insistent: if you do such a study, this means that you start with some hypotheses. My hypothesis is that the number of journalists doing investigative journalism in Bulgaria is on the decline. Would you agree? Investigative journalism is difficult in its nature and it requires too much effort of a purely personal nature and the issue is whether we have enough journalists to devote their time and do the effort to achieve results. I doubt that there are many people willing and able to do it. I am not sure if it is the circumstances that put us in the situation of having fewer and fewer investigations. Of course, I do not rule out the effect of the market. Investigative journalism is expensive and time-consuming but it is the cherry on the pie. And is it more dangerous to do investigative journalism now? I do not know if it is dangerous. I do not feel threatened. I have not received any threats. All the more, it is necessary to look around and see what is going on in Bulgaria in terms of quality to have any grounds to claim that. Several days ago it emerged that two Bulgarian correspondents of Deutsche Welle, Emi Baruh and Ivan Bedrov, were fired on ethical grounds. In the public domain, this was again interpreted as them affecting certain political interests. What is your opinion about this? We invited them both in “This Morning” on September 25. I familiarised with the letter of the bank and the official statement of Deutsche Welle. The position of Deutsche Welle is not substantiated and adequate. How is it possible that the editorial department at Deutsche Welle claim that the allegations toward their colleagues are unjustified and at the same time terminate relations with them. Besides, the work of these authors has always been subject to editorial review. Where is his responsibility in this case? I also do not understand the analysis made by the representatives of the bank. My colleagues’ articles are published as commentaries. This article type has its specificities which have not been taken in consideration. Ivan and Emi told me that Deutsche Welle’s assertions that they have been familiarised with written standards and rules in the beginning of their collaboration, are not true. I have worked with Ivan Bedrov in bTV and he is an exceptional professional. I am convinced that he approached the matter professionally. To me, the attitude toward both journalists is a reason for concern and sends a bad signal. How do you expect that events unfold from here onwards in political terms, do you expect pressure to escalate? I have no idea where things will go but we as journalists have to first get our own things square and if we are to work professionally and in the public interest, we will be in the best position possible.Photo credit: bTV Newscenter_img to go further Bulgaria’s general election: RSF publishes 10 proposals to rescue press freedom News RSF and 60 other organisations call for an EU anti-SLAPP directive BulgariaEurope – Central Asia The car of Genka Shikerova, a journalist known for her incisive interviews of Bulgarian politicians, was set on fire outside her Sofia home on the night of 16 September, reviving concern about freedom of information and the safety of journalists in Bulgaria. Reporters Without Borders, which condemns this act of arson, is publishing an interview with Shikerova. RSF_en February 11, 2021 Find out more March 10, 2021 Find out more December 2, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

June 12

Minister carries out threat to shut down French station’s broadcasts throughout country

first_img February 18, 2021 Find out more July 28, 2009 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Minister carries out threat to shut down French station’s broadcasts throughout country News RSF_en Reporter jailed in DRC for allegedly defaming parliamentarian Follow the news on Democratic Republic of Congo Reporters Without Borders and Journalist in Danger (JED), its partner organisation in Democratic Republic of Congo, strongly condemn the government’s shutdown of local FM retransmission of the French public radio station Radio France Internationale (RFI) throughout the country since 26 July. The two organisations urge the authorities to rescind the ban.“This measure confirms that certain government officials have it in for RFI and makes us fear more authoritarian excesses,” Journalist in Danger president Donat M’Baya Tshimanga said. “The government has taken a very disturbing decision,” Reporters Without Borders secretary-general Jean-François Julliard added. “By shutting down RFI, it has deprived half of the Congolese population of the access it needs to independent news.”Reporters Without Borders and Journalist in Danger point out that, instead of silencing RFI, the Congolese authorities could use their right of reply whenever they see fit.JED has confirmed from various sources that RFI’s broadcasts on the FM waveband have been cut since 26 July in Kinshasa (the country’s capital), Lubumbashi (the capital of the southern province of Katanga) Kisangani (the capital of the northeastern province of Orientale) and Matadi (the capital of the western province of Bas-Congo).Communications minister Lambert Mendé Omalanga confirmed to Reporters Without Borders by telephone yesterday that all local retransmission of RFI has been suspended. “I am not in a position to make a public statement today,” he said, “We will hold a news conference tomorrow in Kinshasa to explain why we had to take this grave decision.” He invited JED to attend the news conference at 1 p.m. today in Kinshasa’s Grand Hotel.RFI said the government’s reason for the shutdown was the broadcasting of information explaining why certain former rebel units had decided to desert from the Congolese army, into which they had recently been incorporated. RFI pointed out that the information had been provided by the United Nations Mission in Democratic Republic of Congo (MONUC) at a news conference on 22 July.RFI’s signal in Bukavu (the capital of the eastern province of Sud-Kivu) has been cut since 10 June, when the communications minister had threatened to extend the measure to the rest of the country. “We accuse RFI of trying to incite soldiers to disobey their superiors and to revolt, and of stirring up problems in the barracks while the country is at war,” he said at the time.Reporters Without Borders has received complaints from residents in Kivu since the shutdown there. Eric Muvomo, the head of a human rights group based in Luvungi, near Bukavu, said: “the population of the Ruzizi-Sud-Kivu plain is not happy with this draconian measure by the minister Lambert Mendé,” he said. “The public needs to be informed about the army’s situation in the province and about military operations.”A local radio station manager told Reporters Without Borders: “What will they do with the small local stations? The RFI shutdown sends a strong signal. It means the authorities are prepared to do anything, even to close all the other media.”A human rights activist said: “We are definitely missing RFI a great deal in Bukavu. We find it hard to accept the shutdown, which was decided suddenly without any consultation with the population.” Help by sharing this information News February 24, 2021 Find out more Organisation center_img Democratic Republic of CongoAfrica to go further Congolese reporter wounded by gunshot while covering protest in Goma February 16, 2021 Find out more Receive email alerts News Democratic Republic of CongoAfrica Journalist arrested on provincial governor’s orders Newslast_img read more

June 12

Surveillance of foreign press tightened, two fixers held by security services for past month

first_img February 11, 2021 Find out more YemenMiddle East – North Africa Reporters Without Borders has written to Yemeni interior minister Mutahar Rashad Al-Masri calling for the immediate release of two brothers, Ali Nasser Kaid Al-Bokheiti and Mohammed Ahmed Hassan Al-Bokheiti, who were arrested on 21 July at a military roadblock with a British freelance journalist for whom they working as fixers.The British journalist was deported the same day. They have been held ever since at the headquarters of the political security police in Sanaa. They have not been taken before a judge, they have not been charged and they have not been allowed to see a lawyer during the month they have been held.“We wrote to one of your predecessors three years ago about the detention of two fixers, Munif and Naif Damesh, who were arrested with two foreign journalists,” Reporters Without Borders said in its letter. “On their return from Sadah, there were held for six weeks at political security headquarters, probably in the same cells that Ali Nasser Kaid Al-Bokheiti and Mohammed Ahmed Hassan Al-Bokheiti have occupied for the past month.”The letter added: “The arrests of the Bokheiti brothers are the latest example of the news blackout that your government is trying to impose on the fighting in northern Yemen. Foreign journalists are only allowed to move about the country with a guide appointed by the information ministry. Those who do not comply with this requirement are sent home and their Yemeni employees are summarily jailed.”The family, which has not received any news about the two brothers, has voiced growing concern to Reporters Without Borders.“We call for the immediate release of Ali and Mohammed because they did not commit any crime,” a member of the family said. “The fact that the authorities have not so far brought any charges against them is evidence of this. We are forbidden to see them, which is against the law. We have learned from indirect contacts that they are accused of helping a foreign journalist go to Sadah. The authorities do not want the public to know about the damage done to the town by the air raids.”The British journalist being accompanied by the Bokheiti brothers had wanted to go to Marib, a place visited by tourists 800 km northeast of the capital. After being arrested at a military roadblock, all three were escorted back to Sanaa and taken to the headquarters of the public security department, where they were interrogated separately. The British journalist was put on a flight to Qatar later that evening. August 20, 2008 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Surveillance of foreign press tightened, two fixers held by security services for past month Fixer for foreign reporters held in Aden for past five months Yemeni journalist killed, nine wounded in Aden airport explosions News Help by sharing this information News Organisation February 26, 2021 Find out more Receive email alerts January 6, 2021 Find out more YemenMiddle East – North Africa Follow the news on Yemen Reporters Without Borders has written to Yemeni interior minister Mutahar Rashad Al-Masri calling for the immediate release of two brothers, Ali Nasser Kaid Al-Bokheiti and Mohammed Ahmed Hassan Al-Bokheiti, who were arrested on 21 July at a military roadblock with a British freelance journalist for whom they working as fixers. News News United Nations: press freedom situation “deeply worrying” in Yemen, according to RSF RSF_en to go furtherlast_img read more

June 12

Provincial correspondent gets three-month suspended prison sentence for using leaked documents

first_imgNews News AlgeriaMiddle East – North Africa May 18, 2021 Find out more Receive email alerts Reporters Without Borders condemns the three-month suspended prison sentence and fine of 30,000 dinars (350 euros) which a court in the city of Annaba (600 km east of Algiers) imposed yesterday on journalist Noureddine Boukraa for “violating the confidentiality of a judicial investigation by use of classified documents.” The court dismissed additional charges of libel and damaging the “reputation of a state entity” brought by the prosecutor’s office, which had requested a more severe sentence.“Press offences should not be punished by prison sentences, whether suspended or not,” Reporters Without Borders said. “The fragile freedoms available to journalists in Algeria need to be consolidated by means of legislative reform. Boukraa was punished despite respecting and applying the correct procedures for journalistic investigation and verification.”A correspondent for the national Arabic-language daily Ennahar, Boukraa was convicted in connection with a 12 November 2007 article in which, on the basis of leaked documents, he accused members of the police of influence-peddling.————————————————————22.10.2008 Reporters without borders urges dismissal of case after ministry seeks one year jail sentence against journalistReporters Without Borders said today it was shocked that the public ministry had called for a one-year jail sentence against journalist Noureddine Boukraa, at a court hearing in Annaba, 600 kilometres east of the capital Algiers on 13 October 2008. Sentence is due on 26 October.Boukraa, who worked for the daily newspaper Ennahar, was convicted of three charges after the public security chief in Annaba, Draia Messaoud, laid a complaint over an article on 12 November 2007, in which the journalist accused members of the local police force of influence-peddling. He was charged with “breaching the confidentiality of an investigation by using classified documents”, “damaging the reputation of a constitutional state body” and “defamation”. Messaoud, who is a civil party to the case, is claiming 60,000 dinars (700 euros) in damages.The journalist obtained his information from a former head of the security branch of the police force, who has also been charged. Boukraa was held in custody from March to June 2008. “The court has cast doubt on my profession as a journalist by charging me with telling the truth”, Boukraa told Reporters Without Borders. He said the judges did not contest the reliability of what he reported but the fact of divulging the information.“I am in now way obliged to preserve secrecy when an official stops respecting his commitment to public service and is motivated by personal gain”, he added.“Noureddine Boukraa is facing prison for having exposed nepotism within some services of the police. This case shows how some representatives of the public ministry are subjugated to local bosses and their highly-placed protectors,” the worldwide press freedom organisation said.“It would be completely unacceptable for the journalist to be jailed for having sought to inform the public about certain abuses. We urge the court in Annaba to dismiss and close the case”, it added. Organisation Boukraa has now left Ennahar and is working for the daily newspaper Algérie News. Algeria is ranked 121st out of 173 countries on Reporters Without Borders’ world press freedom rankings released on 22 October 2008. For more information. October 27, 2008 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Provincial correspondent gets three-month suspended prison sentence for using leaked documents Help by sharing this information May 12, 2021 Find out morecenter_img April 29, 2021 Find out more Algeria pressures reporters by delaying renewal of accreditation AlgeriaMiddle East – North Africa RSF_en to go further Harassment of Algerian reporters intensifies in run-up to parliamentary elections Follow the news on Algeria News Algeria : Reporter jailed after covering Tuareg protests in southern Algeria Newslast_img read more

June 12

Report handed in to “Internet Enemy” embassies on eve of Online Free Expression Day

first_img March 12, 2009 – Updated on January 25, 2016 Report handed in to “Internet Enemy” embassies on eve of Online Free Expression Day Help by sharing this information RSF_en Reporters Without Borders yesterday handed in copies of its 2009 “Internet Enemies” report at the Paris embassies of the 22 countries identified as an “enemy” or source of concern in the report, issued to mark Online Free Expression Day today. The Tunisian and Burmese embassies refused to take its copy. “Online censorship today concerns every kind of user of the Internet, from the person who posts a comment on a website to journalists and other content producers,” Reporters Without Borders said. “Any attack on this space is an offence against free expression.” News The report identifies 12 countries as “Enemies of the Internet.” They are Burma, China, Cuba, Egypt, Iran, North Korea, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan and Vietnam. For the first time, the report also includes two democracies in the 10 other countries that are “under surveillance” for adopting or considering measures that could open the way to abuses of online freedom of information. (Download in PDF).To mark Online Free Expression Day, Reporters Without Borders today also released a film illustrating the situation that some users face when they connect to the Internet. One of the Internet’s founders, Google vice-president Vinton Cerf, also talks about the way the Internet is evolving in an interview during the LIFT 2009 Conference of new technology experts held in Geneva from 25 to 27 February.Vinton Cerf on free speechenvoyé par rsf_internet Organisation last_img read more

June 12

When media bosses censor their own journalists

first_img Help by sharing this information RSF’s 2020 Round-up: 50 journalists killed, two-thirds in countries “at peace” News Organisation Follow the news on Honduras RSF_en May 13, 2021 Find out more to go further 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policies Receive email alerts Reporters Without Borders condemns the censorship of Suelte la lengua (Talk freely), a programme that Canal 6 TV has not broadcast since 15 May without any explanation from its CEO, Paul Misselem. Presented by Jorge Burgos and Emy Padilla, the programme is openly critical of President Juan Orlando Hernández’s government.“We call on Canal 6 to resume broadcasting Suelte la lengua without delay,” said Camille Soulier, the head of the Reporters Without Borders Americas desk. “Pressure from the authorities cannot justify depriving Hondurans of a programme that is in the general interest.”Burgos and Padilla have repeatedly been censored by Canal 6’s own management. Their programme, which has often linked banks and commercial enterprises to corruption, has upset some of the TV station’s shareholders.Padilla reports that, in the middle of recording one programme, she was passed a note from the Canal 6 production staff ordering her not to mention a certain subject. Suelte la lengua often has guests who involved in human rights, especially the heads of NGOs and grass-roots organizations.This climate of censorship affects other independent journalists as well. Ricardo Guerra of Actualidad Porteña, a programme broadcast by Teleport Cortés, a regional TV station based in the northern city of Puerto Cortés, has described the problems in this region to Reporters Without Borders.“We are censored by the heads of the media groups,” he said. “This is a new phenomenon. We cannot cover all subjects. Some are off-limits because they jeopardize the economic interests of these media as regards certain companies. Independent journalists who propose a story about the Puerto Cortés authorities are often told ‘We don’t cover that’.”Guerra also said he often received threats or insults by telephone that are directly linked to what he has reported on the air.Honduras is ranked 129th out of 180 countries in the 2014 Reporters Without Borders press freedom index.Logo: Ricardo Guerra, Teleport Cortés Slideshow: Jorge Burgos and Emy Padilla, Canal 6center_img Reports HondurasAmericas April 27, 2021 Find out more May 28, 2014 – Updated on January 20, 2016 When media bosses censor their own journalists RSF begins research into mechanisms for protecting journalists in Latin America News HondurasAmericas News December 28, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

June 12

Witnesses give contradictory views about motives for Gongadze murder

first_img Ukrainian media group harassed by broadcasting authority Follow the trial News Ukraine escalates “information war” by banning three pro-Kremlin media February 26, 2021 Find out more Organisation October 6, 2006 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Witnesses give contradictory views about motives for Gongadze murder News News Follow the news on Ukraine Receive email alerts Witnesses disagreed on the central question of whether journalist Georgy Gongadze was killed for criticising President Leonid Kuchma’s government when they testified during the latest hearings on 29 September and 4 October in the Kiev trial of three policemen accused of his murder in 2000.Former colleague Lyudmila Frolova, who began working with him at Ukrainskaya Pravda in April 1999 and who is a friend of his widow, Myroslava, testified that she noticed the couple’s home was under surveillance in July 2000. She said she saw two suspicious-looking men seating in the courtyard during her visits. Asked why she thought he was murdered, Frolova replied: “There was no information in his articles that could have prompted anyone to murder him.”But Yulia Mostova, the editor of Mirror Weekly, said she was convinced President Kuchma was prodded by someone in his entourage to have Gongadze murdered. The recordings made by Kuchma bodyguard Mykola Melnychenko proved that Gongadze’s articles were threatening someone close to the president if not the president himself, she said. UkraineEurope – Central Asia Crimean journalist “confesses” to spying for Ukraine on Russian TV March 26, 2021 Find out more Help by sharing this information UkraineEurope – Central Asia News to go further RSF_en September 7, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

June 12

Human rights and anti-coup activist gunned down on Tegucigalpa street

first_imgNews 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policies Organisation RSF’s 2020 Round-up: 50 journalists killed, two-thirds in countries “at peace” Follow the news on Honduras News April 27, 2021 Find out more to go further RSF_en Human rights activist Walter Tróchez’s fatal shooting on 13 December in Tegucigalpa is a “cruel reminder that the repression that began with the 28 June coup d’état is far from over,” Reporters Without Borders said today, warning the international community it would be wrong to think that the elections organised by the de facto authorities on 29 November have ended Honduras’s deep political crisis.“Tróchez paid with his life for his commitment to human rights, exposing the truth about the abuses resulting from the coup, and defending sexual minorities,” Reporters Without Borders said. “Ensuring that his murder is punished will be an early, crucial test for the incoming government, which was elected in questionable circumstances and which says it wants to promote national reconciliation. Reconciliation without justice is meaningless.”An active defender of the rights of gays, lesbians and people with HIV/AIDS, Tróchez, aged 25, was also a critic of President Manuel Zelaya’s ouster last June and had been a researcher and spokesman for the Centre for Human Rights Research and Promotion (CIPRODEH) since the coup. He was shot in the chest by a drive-by gunman as he walked along a Tegucigalpa street on the evening of 13 December. Tróchez was beaten and humiliated because of his homosexuality when arrested during a demonstration outside parliament in Tegucigalpa on 20 July. Kidnapped on 4 December by masked men who threatened to kill him because of his anti-coup activism, he managed to escape. The abduction was reported to the authorities the next day but he was not given any protection.The serious violations of the right to news and information since the coup, which Reporters Without Borders and six other international press freedom organisations confirmed during a joint visit to Honduras from 1 to 7 November, were not brought to an end by the 29 November elections.On election day itself, police tried to storm the San Pedro Sula headquarters of regional radio station Radio Uno, equipment was again seized from Radio Globo and the Canal 36 TV station, and Spanish freelance photographer Mario Gazcón Aranda was briefly arrested. On 5 December, gunmen ransacked the headquarters of opposition online newspaper El Libertador, whose editor, Jhony Lagos, has been threatened many times since the coup.As a result of the coup and its aftermath, Honduras’s ranking in the Reporters Without Borders press freedom index fell from 99th last year to 128th this year. The index covers 175 countries. December 28, 2020 Find out morecenter_img HondurasAmericas May 13, 2021 Find out more News December 16, 2009 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Human rights and anti-coup activist gunned down on Tegucigalpa street RSF begins research into mechanisms for protecting journalists in Latin America Reports Help by sharing this information Receive email alerts HondurasAmericas last_img read more

June 12

Journalist threatened at Bouaké

first_imgNews Côte d’IvoireAfrica December 22, 2003 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Journalist threatened at Bouaké to go further RSF_en News Côte d’IvoireAfrica Follow the news on Côte d’Ivoire News November 27, 2020 Find out more Organisation center_img Reports The 2020 pandemic has challenged press freedom in Africa Receive email alerts October 16, 2020 Find out more RSF’s recommendations for protecting press freedom during Côte d’Ivoire’s elections Reporters Without Borders has expressed concern at threats made by an opposition spokesman against Baba Coulibaly, correspondent in the northern town of Bouaké for independent daily newspaper L’Inter and Reuters and Pana news agencies. The international press freedom organisation called on Communications minister Guillaume Soro, secretary general of opposition Ivory Coast Patriotic Movement (MPCI) to issue a strongly condemnation of the threats. Coulibaly told Reporters Without Borders on 20 December that MPCI spokesman, Sidiki Konaté, had threatened him by phone, telling him that he was becoming “a nuisance” and advising him to think carefully about what he said. These threats may well be linked to the publication of an interview by the journalist with rebel chief Bamba Kassoum, in the 20 December edition of L’Inter under the headline “Bamba Kassoum or “Kass” (rebel leader) “The rebellion has not achieved its objectives”. Coulibaly told Reporters Without Borders that he was worried about his safety given the current crisis in the country and that he was based in the rebel-held northern part of the country. Help by sharing this information Threats against journalists in run-up to Côte d’Ivoire’s presidential election October 29, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

June 12

Inquest into the deaths of “Balibo five” resumes after two-month suspension

first_imgNews Google experiments drop Australian media from search results February 22, 2021 Find out more January 21, 2021 Find out more News Reporters Without Borders today hailed the resumption this week of an inquest into the murders of cameraman Brian Peters and four other journalists 32 years ago in East Timor, saying it hoped every aspect of their deaths would be clarified and insisting that it was not too late for those responsible to be punished.After suspending hearings for two months, a Sydney coroner resumed the inquest behind closed doors on 2 May. The five journalists, all employed by Australian news media, were killed in the town of Balibo on 16 October 1975, at the start of an Indonesian invasion of East Timor.”We hope that all the people summoned by coroner Dorelle Pinch, including Gough Whitlam, Yunus Yosfiah, Guy Peterson, Michael Griggs, Ronald Shepherd, Sam O’Shea and Brian Osborne, will come and testify before the Sydney court,” Reporters Without Borders said. “Their testimony will be crucial for shedding light on the murkier aspects of this case. Justice must finally be rendered to the families of these five journalists, who were killed for seeing ‘too much’ in Balibo.” AustraliaAsia – Pacific RSF condemns Facebook’s blocking of journalistic content in Australia David Jenkins, a former editor of the Sydney Morning Herald’s international service, told the inquest on 2 May that Indonesian army officers were aware of the journalists’ presence in Balibo before they took the town. Indonesia’s Gen. Benny Murdani, for example, said in an interview on 22 July 1995 that he had known the five journalists were in Balibo. Another Indonesian army officer, Col. Dading Kabualdi, said in an interview around the same time that he was in Balibo that day.Jenkins added that, in the course of a phone conversation in 1999, he obtained an implicit admission from then Indonesian information minister Yunis Yosfiah that he had been in Balibo during the 1975 invasion.A former telephone operator at the Sydney international telephone exchange told the inquest yesterday that she overheard a phone conversation in which a native English-speaking man in the East Timor capital of Dili told someone at the Melbourne-based The Age newspaper that Indonesia troops killed the five journalists. She said she remained silent until now for fear of being punished under the Crimes and Official Secrets Act. Despite assurances of immunity from the coroner, other witnesses also expressed concern about testifying freely to the inquest.Several letters received by the coroner in the past two months from politicians who were in office in 1975 were read out to the court yesterday afternoon. Former defence minister Bill Morrison confirmed in one of the letters that he was told of the deaths of the five journalists only six hours after the event, in a meeting at the defence ministry attended by then intelligence chief Gordon Jockel. He received confirmation of the news at 4 p.m. the same day from Arthur Tange, the then secretary of the department of foreign affairs.Then prime minister Gough Whitlam continues to insist he did not know about the deaths of the five journalists until five days after the event. He and Morrisson are scheduled to testify to the coroner on 8 May. But Australia’s ambassador to Indonesia in 1975, Richard Woolcott, has not been summoned although he met senior Indonesian army officers shortly before the killings. Organisation to go further May 4, 2007 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Inquest into the deaths of “Balibo five” resumes after two-month suspension On eve of the G20 Riyadh summit, RSF calls for public support to secure the release of jailed journalists in Saudi Arabia Follow the news on Australia Help by sharing this information Receive email alerts News News RSF_en AustraliaAsia – Pacific November 19, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more