December 29

NEW YEAR, NEW YOU…THE DONEGALDAILY GUIDE TO GETTING STARTED

first_imgSo where do I start?Start walking for an amount of time that feels comfortable – anywhere from 10 to 30 minutes. Once you can walk for 30 minutes easily, start introducing 60 second jogging intervals into your walking. As time goes on, make the jogging intervals longer, until you are running for 30 minutes straight. Track running is better for you (like at the Aura Leisure Centre in Letterkenny), but you can just easily go to your nearest beach. Whatever your level of fitness you should comfortably be able to build from nothing to running continuously for 30 minutes in the space of eight weeks. All you need to do is make a commitment to run at least three times a week and follow this simple run-walk programme which will gradually ease you towards the goal.A few things to bear in mind: Is something wrong if I am out of breath?Running causes you to breathe harder than usual, so some amount of huffing and puffing is normal. Most of that out-of-breath feeling diminishes as you become fitter. Concentrate on breathing from deep down in your belly, and if you have to, slow down or take walking breaks. If the breathlessness persists, ask your doctor about the possibility that you may have asthma. Where should I run?You can run anywhere that’s safe and enjoyable. The best running routes are scenic, well lit, and free of traffic. There also soft: choose trails or smooth grass rather than roads. Think of running as a way to explore new territory. Use your watch to gauge your distance, and set out on a new adventure each time you run. Talk to other runners about the routes they run. The more varied your routes, the easier running will feel. If you are out on the open roads at night, you must wear high visibility vests and gear. I often suffer from a stitch when I run. Will these ever go away?Side stitches are common among beginners because the abdomen is not used to the jostling that running causes. Most runners find that stitches go away as fitness increases. Also, don’t eat any solid foods in the hour before you run. When you get a stitch, breathe deeply, concentrating on pushing all of the air out of your abdomen. This will stretch out your diaphragm muscle (just below your lungs), which is usually where a cramp occurs. So you want to get fit, but you can’t afford a personal trainer. Then take up running. Invest in a good pair of trainers at your local Donegal sports store and before you know it, you will be addicted. But it does help of course to have some advice so here’s some answers to some of those questions you may have: Is it normal to feel pain during running?They do say ‘no pain, no gain’. Some discomfort is normal as you start out but you should always try to do some stretching beforehand. If you are in real pain, you should take a complete break for a few days until the injury heals. If it doesn’t disappear, consult your GP.What sort of footwear do I need?Running doesn’t require much investment in gear and accessories, but you have to have a good pair of running shoes. Unlike all-round trainers, running shoes are designed to allow your foot to strike the ground properly, reducing the amount of shock that travels up your leg. They’re also made to fit your foot snugly, which reduces the slipping and sliding that can lead to blisters. There are some great sites online, but it’s hard to beat the advice at your local sports shop.What’s best for me – treadmill or outside?A treadmill ‘pulls’ the ground underneath your feet, and you don’t meet any wind resistance, which makes running somewhat easier. Many treadmills are padded, making them a good option if you’re carrying a few extra pounds or are injury-prone and want to decrease impact. To better simulate the effort of outdoor running, you can always set your treadmill at a one per cent incline. But it is hard to beat the great outdoors – and it is cheaper! Track running is better for you (like at the Aura Leisure Centre in Letterkenny), but you can just easily go to your nearest beach. There’s plenty in Donegal to go round! Should I breathe through my nose or my mouth?Probably the latter, which will allow you to get as much oxygen as possible to your working muscles. However, some runners breathe through their noses during training runs, believing that this keeps them more relaxed. Do what works for you. So you want to get fit – but it doesn’t have to cost you a cent. As more and more people take up running, here’s the Donegal Daily guide to getting started: Week 1 Run one min, walk 90 seconds. Repeat eight times. Do three times a week.Week 2 Run two mins, walk one min. Repeat seven times. Do three times a week.Week 3 Run three mins walk one mins. Repeat six times. Do three times a week.Week 4 Run five mins, walk two mins. Repeat four times. Do three times a week.Week 5 Run eight mins, walk two mins. Repeat three times. Do three times a week.Week 6 Run 12 mins, walk one min. Repeat three times. Do three times a week.Week 7 Run 15 mins, walk one min, Run fifteen mins. Do three times a weekWeek 8 Run 30 mins continuouslyNEW YEAR, NEW YOU…THE DONEGALDAILY GUIDE TO GETTING STARTED was last modified: January 4th, 2011 by gregShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Allow at least a day between runs when you begin.If in doubt, slow down. You should be able to hold a conversation while you run. Respecting your body is the best route to progression.Walk purposefully, and be strict with your run/walk timings.Don’t be afraid to repeat a week, or drop back a week. Everyone’s different.Take heart – you can do it!Here’s our guide to getting you up and running:last_img read more