December 20

Army Provides Mobile Satellite Communications For Disaster Response

first_imgBy Dialogo January 27, 2011 De hecho, cuando alguien no entiende, depende de los otros visitantes ayudar, y eso ocurre aquí.dgedggddcdffgeef Este sitio web es mayormente un recorrido de toda la información que uno desea saber pero no sabe a quién preguntar. Echa un vistazo aquí y sin duda lo descubrirás. eedkbedcbckfgbdd Sometimes the enemy isn’t an insurgency – it’s a storm surge. Just ask Col. Quill Ferguson. “When you enter into a crisis situation, normally one of the first things to go is your communications,” said Col. Ferguson, G6 for U.S. Army North, which frequently responds to natural disasters. “Having a satellite-based network allows you to bridge some of that infrastructure damage that you normally get, whether it’s an earthquake, a hurricane or another man-made or natural event.” In the years since Hurricane Katrina exposed dangerous information gaps between various government responders, the Army has developed high-tech capabilities that enable rapid, inter-agency communications during an emergency. One of those systems, the Joint Incident Site Communications Capability, or JISCC, has been deployed in response to wildfires in California, the earthquake in Haiti and other disaster areas, said Joseph Cellini, JISCC project lead for the Army’s Program Executive Office Command, Control and Communications – Tactical (PEO C3T). In austere battlefield environments, network infrastructure can be nonexistent – leaving Soldiers to rely on imported satellite communications to transmit information by voice, data and video. Back in the U.S., a disaster that wipes out the communications infrastructure can have the same chilling effect. “The advanced, futuristic technologies that we live with go away, and you become very austere,” Cellini said. “You have no electricity, satellite, bandwidth and communications. Think of all the things we do on a daily basis. Now take it all away. That’s really what happens at an incident site such as 9/11 and such as Katrina.” Now, the Army is able to fill that void by bringing in its own communications pipelines. Army North relies on vehicles powered by a generator and equipped with a satellite connection, allowing Soldiers to connect with their higher headquarters on both classified and unclassified networks, said Sgt. 1st Class Alberto Hernandez, who is assigned to Army North. “Once we have established communications through the satellite link, it’s just like being back at the office. You have the same capabilities,” Hernandez said. “It helps immensely.” The familiar, user-friendly equipment for transmitting voice, video and data means personnel don’t confront a “learning gap” in the critical moments, Ferguson said. “We can be on the air in 10 minutes or better, and that means the difference in saving lives and coordinating with the first responders at every level – whether it’s the local, state or federal level,” he said. “The most crucial element of any crisis is information, and being able to disseminate that information, to share it with the right people, at the right time.” In addition to satellite feeds, both the Army North vehicles and the JISCC come equipped with handheld portable radios that can run on various bands and frequencies, permitting different agencies to talk to one another. That provides simultaneous situational awareness for first responders including police and fire departments, Emergency Medical Technicians, state and local governments, and relief organizations such as the Red Cross, Cellini said. “There are no longer these disparate communication nodes he said.”Everyone can talk by doing talk groups. It brings everyone on the same common page.”last_img read more

December 18

Tech must-haves for 2015

first_imgDon’t forget your members when choosing where to invest your budget dollarsAs 2014 comes to a close and technology budgets are finalized for the coming year, many credit unions are considering key technology investments for 2015. The obvious upgrades to core processors, online banking, loan origination systems, in-branch technology, and the like are, of course, at the top of the list. But there are also frequently overlooked options that credit unions should consider as key to improving their members’ banking experience. Some are small, some are big, but all three of these recommendations will be noticed and appreciated by your members.Go native with your mobile bankingMobile banking is the single biggest vulnerability facing most credit unions today and is the most likely entry point for competitors — both traditional and non-traditional financial institutions — to poach credit unions’ members. (Click here for a free report that examines the potential sources of disruption facing credit unions in the next year.) A quick search of the 20 largest banks and credit unions shows they all offer native apps for both Apple iOS and Google Android. Still, many credit unions are still not dedicating enough resources to this critical channel. In a recent report from Accenture, 67% of Millennials said they feel the traditional and digital experience they receive from their bank is “somewhat or not at all seamless.”Bridge the gap between in-app and in-branch experience by focusing on your mobile banking offering and adding all the functionality your members want — mobile deposit, PFM, p2p payments, etc. Then, make sure that the services available in both channels are connected and the service they provide from your employees in a branch is consistent with what is available within your mobile banking apps.Upgrade your website with responsive web designThe number of screen sizes being used grows on a daily basis: desktops, laptops, iPad, iPad Mini, iPhone (now in 3 sizes), Kindle Fire, Surface, Galaxy — the list goes on. How your credit union is represented on all of these devices, no matter what the screen size, is important to maintaining a uniform image. With 47% of members using the Internet or mobile devices as their primary method of banking, your image needs to be consistent in the same way that each of your branches are. The right image can attract members and encourage existing members to expand their relationship with your credit union; the wrong image can be offputting. Your most important branch is probably your website, not any single, physical location.Put simply, responsive websites improve how your content is presented, enhance readability, result in faster page rendering, and are SEO-optimized. Josh Rubin, renown interaction designer and co-founder of Cool Hunting, adds, “Responsive web design isn’t just about adapting the interface to screen size; it’s about understanding the situation people are in when they’re using different devices.” Responsive design isn’t a new concept, but it is more important now than it has been in the past as device types and sizes for both tablets and smartphones are rapidly multiplying. To check if your site is responsive, open your credit union’s homepage and slowly resize the screen using your mouse. If the layout doesn’t change and instead scroll bars appear on the bottom of the browser window, you don’t have a responsive website.Add social media channels to your member service programsSocial media channels — Twitter and Facebook in particular — are important for reaching members and protecting and building your credit union’s reputation. Brandwatch hit the nail on the head when it said, “Every meaningful social conversation can be nurtured into a real relationship that can eventually become a direct revenue opportunity, positive word-of-mouth, or direct referral.”Social media is the ultimate level playing field. The upside is that it’s as easy way for you to inject your brand into social media conversations as it is for much-bigger competitors. The downside is that it takes a dedicated team member who is adept at handling communications across different technology platforms and is committed to providing real-time responses in the spirit of your credit union’s member service ethos. Look for a digital native with social savvy — probably a Millennial — to run your social media programs with the goal to inform and educate the public, respond to your members in real time with general information about products or promotions, and move conversations to a secure channel when they become confidential and require privacy.Native apps, responsive websites, and social media connected member service are just a few areas that credit unions should look to substantially improve the service they provide their members. Don’t overlook these areas when creating your budgets or roadmaps for 2015. 36SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Andrew Tilbury Andrew Tilbury is the Chief Marketing Officer of Bluepoint and oversees Bluepoint’s integrated marketing strategy and product management including brand management, media relations, interactive marketing, and product management. Tilbury … Web: www.bluepointsolutions.com Detailslast_img read more

September 17

Event tackles changing business models in tech

first_imgNotable speakers for the events included Andrew Stalbow, North American general manager of “Angry Birds” creator Rovio, as well as Evan and Gregg Spiridellis, co-founders of JibJab.com, who also unveiled their new company StoryBots at the event.Evan and Greg Spiridellis focused on topics ranging from the changing dynamics of content production to changing business models to their new venture StoryBots.com.The Spiridellis brothers made the point that barriers to entry for the entertainment industry have been removed.“The cost of producing entertainment has plummeted,” the Spiridellis brothers said. “Capital is no longer a barrier to producing entertainment, it’s all about talent.”They also discussed the need to recognize failing business models and to move to more successful ones as a result.The brothers called JibJab’s former business model, which focused on producing political parodies, “a crappy business model.”They discussed how their company moved from their first business model, to one that focused on ecards.“You make great content around life events,” said the Spiridellis brothers, “and that’s what we do now.”Their address culminated with the introduction of their new venture, StoryBots.com, a website aimed at teaching toddlers basic education.The Spiridellis brothers said the reason for creating StoryBots came down to a question: “If Sesame Street were created today, what [would] it be like?”Stalbow’s address focused on topics ranging from the changing dynamics in the interaction of content delivery and production to the company’s business philosophy.Stalbow discussed the increasing difficulty of finding a  business model for entertainment.“It’s hard to build a business model around scarcity,” Stalbow said. “That’s what [Hollywood] fights so hard to protect.”Speaking on content delivery and production, Stalbow pointed out the two views a business can take on app production.“An app is just a piece of software, so it can be anything we want it to be,” Stalbow said. “We treat our apps as a service rather than a product, so we are constantly updating.”Another issue Stalbow said he deals with in his business is the pricing of apps.“Our goal on pricing is to make it a no-brainer for people,” Stalbow said. “We’ve always put our brand and our fans first.”The event drew positive reviews from those in attendance; Sergio Pedroza, a senior majoring in architecture and business administration, said he saw the event as a great opportunity for networking and learning.“This event has created incredible networking opportunities for entrepreneurs. It allows one to get a good perspective on technology, business models and public relations,” Pedroza said.Silicon Beach at USC was hosted by the Institute for Communication Technology Management in partnership with USC’s Lloyd Greif Center for Entrepreneurial Studies and USC’s School of Cinematic Arts. Executives from Sony, JibJab and Rovio were on hand for the Silicon Beach event this week, which started with a venture competition Wednesday and capped off with addresses from various leaders in the industry Thursday.Angry birds · Andrew Stalbow, general manager of Rovio, and Lucy Hood, executive director of USC’s Institute for Communication Technology Management, discuss production of applications like “Angry Birds.” – Zhaoyu Zhou | Daily Trojanlast_img read more

December 29

Donegal sees drop in number of overseas tourists visiting the ‘Coolest Place’

first_imgDonegal was the 10th most-visited county in Ireland by overseas tourists in 2017, according to new figures from Failte Ireland and CSO. Some 255,000 foreign tourists checked out the ‘Coolest Place’ last year and spent €82 million during their stay.However, the figure is a fall of 28,000 visitors from 2016, when 283,000 overseas travellers made Donegal their destination and spent €90 million. Overseas tourist visits to Ireland grew by 3.2% to 9 million in 2017, making it a record-breaking year for tourism nationally. Visitors spent a combined €4.9 billion during their visits.Irish residents took 9.6 million trips within Ireland and spent €1.9 billion last year. Domestic visitors took 376,000 trips to Donegal in 2017, spending €96 million on their travels.The number of local visitors is up by 2,000 from 2016, when 374,000 Irish residents’ trips were made to Donegal, spending  €99.9million.The number one fee-charging attraction in Co. Donegal was Glenveagh Castle and Grounds, with 211,000 visitors exploring the national park in 2017. Malin Head Viewing Point and the Sliabh Liag Cliffs were Donegal’s top free attractions, attracting 172,329 and 164,546 visitors respectively.Overseas tourists from Britain to Ireland have fallen by 5.1% in the last year, while other markets continue to grow. Mainland Europe recorded growth of 5%. North American visitor numbers increased by 16.1%, with the long haul markets increasing by 14.2% in 2017.Donegal sees drop in number of overseas tourists visiting the ‘Coolest Place’ was last modified: August 22nd, 2018 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Failte Irelandtourismlast_img read more