December 20

Brazilian Air Force Psychologists Bring Their Expertise to Haiti

first_imgBy Dialogo May 07, 2012 For the first time ever, psychologists employed by the Brazilian Air Force have been sent to a United Nations peacekeeping mission overseas in order to identify and understand the stresses that affect troops doing this kind of work. Last December, a team from the Air Force Psychology Institute (IPA) shadowed a Brazilian infantry battalion from Manaus that had been deployed to Port-au-Prince as part of the UN Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH). The objective: to improve the training of soldiers sent on similar missions in the future. “It was a unique professional experience,” said Lt. Fabrícia Barros de Souza, a psychologist. “Our soldiers were very receptive, and contributed in a meaningful way to the data collection. They all showed they are highly qualified and mission-driven professionals.” The Brazilian Air Force offers air support to the Brazilian contingent within MINUSTAH and more recently has begun deploying infantry troops. The first infantry units arrived in February 2011 from the northeastern Brazilian cities of Recife, Natal and Fortaleza, but were later replaced by the platoon from Manaus, which remained until the end of April. “We believe it is of that upmost importance that, along with technical and operational excellence, we consider and constantly monitor the psychosocial aspects involved in a mission of this nature,” said Maj. Luis Felipe, an Air Force spokesman. The aim is to ensure that Brazilian troops — which have been in Haiti since 2004 — perform effectively without any harm to their safety and occupational health. Mission objectives The first contingent of Air Force troops deployed to Haiti underwent psychological assessments to determine if any had personal or family-related problems that could cause problems during or after the mission. “The project addresses the issue of stress in peace operations, as a specific part of the daily work of the Brazilian military,” explained Felipe. “Since this monitoring requires a feedback loop, we included a study of professional profiles and a survey of stressors, which would provide legitimacy to the work done with each new soldier.” Lt. Col. Ana Lúcia Lopez, deputy director of the Air Force Psychology Institute, helped her team conduct individual and group interviews, lectures and videoconferences; team members also participated in the daily routines of the soldiers they observed. “The work routine was intense and its results represent only the beginning of a bold venture that seeks to gain visibility for the role of psychology in the operational realm,” said Barros de Souza. Sources of stress Perhaps because these soldiers are not fighting a full-fledged war, it’s easy to underestimate the many sources of stress peacekeepers face, and the long-term effects of that stress. These include being away from the family, living in a different culture and the local conflicts that characterize these kinds of mission. In Haiti, this stress is exacerbated by the extremely poor living conditions of the local population; verbal aggression from some Haitians; the risk of sickness or death from infectious diseases; vulnerability to acts of violence without the ability to respond with weapons; the lack of communication resources to keep in touch with friends and family back home, and — perhaps worst of all — an inability to significantly improve the lives of local people. “The complexity of peace missions has also to do with placing the military in a new situation,” explained Felipe. “It is different than in traditional war, which from the psychological point of view is identified with uncertainty and the unknown.” In this case, he said, “there is also no enemy, which turns the objective of these operations in something more complicated than merely winning. These obstacles not only compromise the performance of the mission, but affect motivation and endanger a soldier’s physical and mental health.” The way forward The aim of the individual and group interviews was to collect data, but Felipe said “we were at their disposal if there was a need for intervention.” Despite limited contact with the locals, the Brazilian team left Port-au-Prince with the distinct impression that Haitians are quite receptive to MINUSTAH’s presence — especially children, who picked up the psychologists’ names in a heartbeat. “The troops say that the smiles of those children are a motivating factor for their work and, in a way, mitigate the adverse conditions of the mission,” said Felipe.last_img read more

January 14

The ‘Miracle Man’ Returns as Coach, But can he make a difference?

first_imgAs the Ebola Virus Disease continues to decline in the country and the normal activities get underway, it makes sense for the Liberia Football Association to put in place important measures to rebuild the national soccer teams of Liberia.The decision by the LFA to appoint ex-celebrated star James Debbah (Salinsa) as the head coach to rebuild the senior national team suggests interesting dimension in the development of players for the national team.Though other former national team players, including Thomas Kojo, Kervin Sebwe and Christopher Wleh received appointments, the FA did not announce how much these men would be paid. Have these newly appointed coaches handled a club for a competition?On his facebook account, the former celebrated player, and Miracle Man, Debbah noted that he is coming to the national team, not as a ‘messiah’ to save Liberian football, but rather as someone to impart discipline to his would-be charges.Truth be told, Debbah knows that Liberian soccer was having many problems, including players and administrative discipline before the outbreak of the Ebola Virus Disease.Indiscipline was rife among players and administrators. For instance, due to the Liberian government’s apparent lack of interest in developing a good national team, critical funds are always not available. The failure to provide needed funds to get better results shows indiscipline of the owners of the team that can work against any determined coach; please ask Coaches Kaetu Smith, Thomas Kojo and Frank Jericho Nagbe about their experiences with the LFA and Youth & Sports.There are instances where players and officials travel on national assignments without per diems. Lone Star’s recent friendly trip to Equatorial Guinea and Junior Lone Star’s CAF return-leg trip to Abidjan are cases in point.At the time of writing, jerseys and other materials belonging to Jr. Lone Star are sitting somewhere in New Kru Town, since they were seized by the players. Their contention was and is that per diems promised them must be paid before the materials are returned to the LFA.Debbah should also understand that the failure of previous coaches, including J. Kaetu Smith, Frank Jericho Nagbe and Thomas Kojo as national coaches were not because they did not know their job. With all due respect Smith, Kojo and Nagbe possessed CAF recognized credentials.It would also be important for Debbah to investigate why those coaches could not make a difference. Interestingly Kojo and even Kervin Sebwe are part of the current appointed coaches and therefore they should tell him why things never worked on the coaching side as well as on the administrative side.Coach Kaetu Smith, without argument is one of the most disciplined coaches Liberia can boast of. Why, then did he not achieve much progress? It would be a wise decision for Debbah to talk to him.Since Debbah has consistently stressed that he would bring discipline to the team, how much discipline can we find in his character?  “Debbah is a changed man,” a friend who knows him well told the Daily Observer, “he has outgrown the things he did when he was young and actively playing in Liberia.”  Ok. But what are his credentials for such an important job? How much is the LFA prepared to pay him? Will his appointment benefits include a car and a residence? In a subsequent examination, we’ll find out how much discipline Coach Debbah has gained for himself to be able to give players that would be under him. While playing professional is one thing, to coach others is a different science altogether that only those who have prepared, are sure to make the difference that Liberian football is crying for and Coach Debbah has promised to deliver.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more