October 6

Stunning Northgate 100-year-old Queenslander perfect for families

first_img119 Ridge St, NorthgateThis 100-year-old Queenslander is not all that it seems from the street. Inside, the traditional home opens to a modern outdoor living space with spacious timber deck and poolside pergola. 119 Ridge St, NorthgateLouise and Jaye Evans bought the home two years ago and moved in with their three children. “The deck and outdoor living was what sold us on the house,” Mrs Evans said. “The home was just so family friendly and ideal for us.”The property, at 119 Ridge St, Northgate, has plenty of heritage features throughout including ornate ceilings, French doors, hoop pine floorboards, VJ walls and western spotted gum and iron bark timber. 119 Ridge St, NorthgateMrs Evans said the home was originally built about 100 years ago and was renovated along the way but it still had plenty of character. “We did a lot of landscaping and we’ve redone the decks, painted the house and redid the kitchen,” she said. “We aimed to keep that charm but modernise it.”Mrs Evans said the home was versatile enough to suit most buyers. “For us it’s an amazing family home but it would also suit older people as it’s all on one level, or families with teenagers as it has that separate bedroom,” she said. The property goes to auction on March 25 at 1pm.center_img One of the bedrooms at 119 Ridge St, NorthgateMore from newsFor under $10m you can buy a luxurious home with a two-lane bowling alley5 Apr 2017Military and railway history come together on bush block24 Apr 2019There are three bedrooms in the main house and a separate bedroom with ensuite and walk-in robe on the back deck. Outside, the veranda overlooks the in-ground swimming pool and landscaped backyard.“It’s a great entertaining house,” Mrs Evans said.“The kitchen has bi-fold doors and inside becomes outside once those doors open.“Generally the kids will be in the pool and we sit on the deck and have a few drinks while they play.”last_img read more

September 27

Is porn immoral? That doesn’t matter: It’s a public health crisis.

first_imgWashington Post 8 April 2016Family First Comment: “… no matter what you think of pornography (whether it’s harmful or harmless fantasy), the science is there. After 40 years of peer-reviewed research, scholars can say with confidence that porn is an industrial product that shapes how we think about gender, sexuality, relationships, intimacy, sexual violence and gender equality — for the worse.” “… Extensive scientific research reveals that exposure to and consumption of porn threaten the social, emotional and physical health of individuals, families and communities, and highlights the degree to which porn is a public health crisis rather than a private matter. But just as the tobacco industry argued for decades that there was no proof of a connection between smoking and lung cancer, so, too, has the porn industry, with the help of a well-oiled public relations machine, denied the existence of empirical research on the impact of its products.”  Last month, the Republican-led Utah House of Representatives became the first legislative body in the United States to pass a resolution declaring pornography “a public health hazard leading to a broad spectrum of individual and public health impacts and societal harms.” The liberal backlash criticized the measure as an antiquated bit of conservative moralizing, with the Daily Beast calling it “hypocritical” and “short-sighted.” “The science just isn’t there,” wrote Rewire, an online journal dedicated to dispelling “falsehoods and misinformation.”The thing is, no matter what you think of pornography (whether it’s harmful or harmless fantasy), the science is there. After 40 years of peer-reviewed research, scholars can say with confidence that porn is an industrial product that shapes how we think about gender, sexuality, relationships, intimacy, sexual violence and gender equality — for the worse. By taking a health-focused view of porn and recognizing its radiating impact not only on consumers but also on society at large, Utah’s resolution simply reflects the latest research.The statistics on today’s porn use are staggering. A Huffington Post headline announced in 2013 that “Porn Sites Get More Visitors Each Month Than Netflix, Amazon and Twitter Combined,” and one of the largest free porn sites in the world, YouPorn, streamed six times the bandwidth of Hulu in 2013. Pornhub, another major free porn site, boasted that in 2015 it received 21.2 billion visits and “streamed 75GB of data a second, which translates to enough porn to fill the storage in around 175 million 16GB iPhones.”Extensive scientific research reveals that exposure to and consumption of porn threaten the social, emotional and physical health of individuals, families and communities, and highlights the degree to which porn is a public health crisis rather than a private matter. But just as the tobacco industry argued for decades that there was no proof of a connection between smoking and lung cancer, so, too, has the porn industry, with the help of a well-oiled public relations machine, denied the existence of empirical research on the impact of its products.Using a wide range of methodologies, researchers from a number of disciplines have shown that viewing pornography is associated with damaging outcomes. In a study of U.S. college men, researchers found that 83 percent reported seeing mainstream pornography, and that those who did were more likely to say they would commit rape or sexual assault (if they knew they wouldn’t be caught) than men who hadn’t seen porn in the past 12 months. The same study found that porn consumers were less likely to intervene if they observed a sexual assault taking place. In a study of young teens throughout the southeastern United States, 66 percent of boys reported porn consumption in the past year; this early porn exposure was correlated with perpetration of sexual harassment two years later. A recent meta-analysis of 22 studies between 1978 and 2014 from seven different countries concluded that pornography consumption is associated with an increased likelihood of committing acts of verbal or physical sexual aggression, regardless of age. A 2010 meta-analysis of several studies found “an overall significant positive association between pornography use and attitudes supporting violence against women.”READ MORE: https://www.washingtonpost.com/posteverything/wp/2016/04/08/is-porn-immoral-that-doesnt-matter-its-a-public-health-crisis/?postshare=2541460284514547&tid=ss_mailKeep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

September 16

Live chat transcript VancouverClark Parks and Recreation director Pete Mayer

first_imgVancouver-Clark Parks and Recreation director Pete Mayer joined Columbian.com users for a live web chat on May 11, 2012. Here’s the transcript. It’s been edited for clarity.Get some background on the issues facing the department in our story that previewed the chat.Matt Wastradowski: Welcome, everyone, to today’s live web chat with Vancouver-Clark Parks and Recreation director Pete Mayer. If you have questions, get them in now! Mayer will join us shortly. In the mean time, here is some background on what’s been up with the department in recent months: http://www.columbian.com/news/2012/may/08/live-chat-vancouver-clark-parks-and-recreation-set/Matt Wastradowski: Pete, when you’re here, please say hi so that I know you’re good to go! And if our readers want to submit questions, feel free to submit them!John Hill: Good morning. Web editor John Hill here. More background: http://www.columbian.com/news/2012/mar/27/vancouver-agrees-to-ask-voters-for-parks-funding/last_img read more