October 19

Russian plane with coronavirus medical gear lands in US after Trump-Putin call

first_img“Trump gratefully accepted this humanitarian aid,” Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov was cited as saying by the Interfax news agency on Tuesday. Trump himself spoke enthusiastically about the Russian help after his call with Putin.The State Department said that following the call between the two leaders, the United States “has agreed to purchase” needed medical supplies, including ventilators and personal protection equipment, from Russia and that they were handed over to the Federal Emergency Management Agency on Wednesday in New York City.”We are a generous and reliable contributor to crisis response and humanitarian action across the world, but we cannot do it alone,” State Department spokeswoman Morgan Ortagus said.”Both countries have provided humanitarian assistance to each other in times of crisis in the past and will no doubt do so again in the future,” she added. “This is a time to work together to overcome a common enemy that threatens the lives of all of us.” Russia sent the United States medical equipment on Wednesday to help fight the coronavirus pandemic, a public relations coup for Russian President Vladimir Putin after he discussed the crisis with US President Donald Trump.Trump, struggling to fill shortages of ventilators and personal protective equipment, accepted Putin’s offer in a phone call on Monday. A Russian military transport plane left an airfield outside Moscow and arrived at New York’s John F. Kennedy airport in late afternoon on Wednesday.Usually, the United States donates supplies to embattled countries rather than accepting them. The origin of the delivery, which Moscow called aid, was bound to revive criticism from Democrats that Trump has been too cozy with the Russian leader. A US official in Washington said the shipment carried 60 tons of ventilators, masks, respirators and other items.The official said the equipment would be carefully examined to make sure it comports with the quality requirements of the US Food and Drug Administration.Russia’s Rossiya 24 channel on Wednesday morning showed the plane taking off from a military air base outside Moscow in darkness. Its cargo hold was filled with cardboard boxes and other packages.Confirmed US coronavirus cases have surged to more than 205,000, with 4,500 deaths.In Russia, the official tally of confirmed cases is 2,337, with 17 deaths, although some doctors there have questioned the accuracy of official data.Strain in relations Relations between Moscow and Washington have been strained in recent years by everything from Syria to Ukraine to US election interference, something Russia denies. Trump spent two years battling a federal investigation into whether his 2016 campaign colluded with Russia.”Nothing to see here. Just a Russian military aircraft landing at JFK with 60 tons of medical supplies to support America’s #COVID19 response. A propaganda bonanza as our own government shrinks from America’s leadership role in a global crisis,” said Brett McGurk, a former diplomat for Trump and former Presidents Barack Obama and George W. Bush.Trump said on Tuesday he and Putin discussed the virus at length. “Russia is being hit pretty hard,” he said.Peskov, Putin’s spokesman, said Moscow hoped the United States might also be able to provide medical help to Russia if necessary when the time came.”It is important to note that when offering assistance to US colleagues, the president (Putin) assumes that when US manufacturers of medical equipment and materials gain momentum, they will also be able to reciprocate if necessary,” Peskov was cited as saying.Peskov complained that some US officials had made it needlessly difficult to expedite the aid. He also was quoted as saying that Russia and China cooperated in a similar way because “at a time when the current situation affects everyone without exception … there is no alternative to working together in a spirit of partnership and mutual assistance.”Russia has also used its military to send planeloads of aid to Italy to combat the spread of the coronavirus, exposing the European Union’s failure to provide swift help to a member in crisis and handing Putin a publicity coup at home and abroad.center_img Topics :last_img read more

October 19

Parents worried about vaccinating children amid pandemic: Survey

first_imgRead also: Let’s get childhood immunization back on trackRespondents expressed concern about the high cost of getting immunization services at private healthcare facilities, services that would be free at public facilities.The Health Ministry’s disease control and prevention director general, Achmad Yurianto, said public health facilities should remain open and safe during the pandemic, and called on parents not to delay giving immunizations to their children.“If any health service facilities are temporarily closed, parents should ask local community health staff for information on the closest alternatives,” said Yurianto, who is also the former national COVID-19 spokesman, as quoted in the statement.The survey, however, also discovered high demand for immunization, showing that some parents and caregivers had looked for alternative service points.The survey showed that parents who had studied the safe immunization guidelines applied by health authorities were more willing to take their children for vaccinations.UNICEF argued that investment in safe immunization and expanding the outreach of health services were important and urgent in order to ease parents’ doubts.“During the pandemic, children must be protected against diseases that can be prevented by immunizations. We must do everything we can so that all children throughout the country can continue to receive this important service,” UNICEF representative Debora Comini said.Topics : Almost one third of Indonesian parents and caregivers are doubtful about taking their children for routine immunizations during the COVID-19 pandemic for fear of contracting the coronavirus, a recent survey has found.The survey, carried out by the Health Ministry in collaboration with UNICEF, collected responses online from nearly 7,000 parents and caregivers of children under the age of 2 in 34 provinces from July 4 to July 13.The survey found that only half of the respondents had taken their children for routine immunizations in the past two months. “Prior to the pandemic, resistance to immunizations had already increased in Indonesia, and this was exacerbated by [immunization] vaccine doubts during the pandemic,” UNICEF said in a statement on Monday.The survey also showed a “significant shift” in parents and caregivers’ behavior in seeking immunization services.Prior to the pandemic, according to the survey, around 90 percent of Indonesian children had availed of immunization services at community health facilities such as community health centers (Puskesmas) and integrated health services posts (Posyandu) as well as village delivery facilities (Polindes).However, the majority of the respondents stated that they were now seeking immunization in private clinics and hospitals due to the closure of government healthcare facilities in their communities.last_img read more