June 12

Bangladeshi journalist found alive after being missing for 53 days

first_imgNews Shocking detention Help by sharing this information RSF calls for the release of Bangladeshi journalist Rozina Islam, unfairly accused of espionage “The first thing he told me was that he was alive and that he was glad to be able to tell me so himself,” Monorom Polok told RSF, describing the phone call he received from his father, at 2:40 a.m. yesterday. RSF_en The day before he disappeared, ruling party MP Saifuzzaman Shikhor brought a complaint against him, accusing him of publishing “false information” about the alleged involvement of well-known figures in a female escort service at a luxury Dhaka hotel. Two other  journalists, Matiur Rahman Chowdhury, the editor of the Manabzamin daily newspaper, and one of Chowdhury’s reporters, are also accused in the same case. Reporters Without Borders (RSF) calls on the Bangladeshi authorities to immediately free Shafiqul Kajol, a journalist who was arrested after being found blindfolded and bound hand and foot at the Indian border, and to investigate how he came to be abducted for 53 days. May 4, 2020 – Updated on December 28, 2020 Bangladeshi journalist found alive after being missing for 53 days News “While it is an immense relief that Shafiqul Kajol has been found safe and sound, his arrest is extremely shocking,” said Daniel Bastard, the head of RSF’s Asia-Pacific desk. “We call on the Bangladeshi prosecutor’s office to order this journalist’s immediate release and to appoint a serious team of investigators to establish how he came to be abducted all this time, which is very mysterious.” BangladeshAsia – Pacific Protecting journalistsProtecting sources DisappearancesImprisonedJudicial harassment Shafiqul Islam Kajol called his son from the Bangladeshi border post at Benapole, near the western city of Jashore, where border officials arrested him after spotting him, bound and blindfolded, in the no-man’s land between Bangladesh and India, at midday on 2 May. Polok told RSF that he was able to see his father yesterday, but the meeting was short and his father was not able to talk about this abduction in any detail. He was handcuffed and was “really scared,” Polok said. A Dhaka-based photojournalist and editor with the Dainik Pakkhakal daily newspaper, Kajol disappeared after leaving his office on the evening of 10 March. An investigation was ordered after his family reported him missing the next day. News February 26, 2021 Find out more Organisation Bangladeshi reporter fatally shot by ruling party activists Follow the news on Bangladesh Receive email alerts to go further As he was not carrying a passport, they arrested him for entering Bangladesh illegally and took him to Jashore, where a district court ordered him held under section 54 of the criminal procedure code, which allows detention where “a reasonable suspicion exists.” He is not due to reappear in court until 19 May. Bangladeshi writer and blogger dies in detention Bangladesh is ranked 151st out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2020 World Press Freedom Index, one place lower than in 2019. Shafiqul Islam Kajol (left), handcuffed, met his son on 3 May in Jashore (photo: MP / RSF). May 19, 2021 Find out more —————————————————————————-UpdateShafiqul Islam Kajol was finally released on bail on 25 December as a result of a decision by the Dhaka high court on 17 December. RSF welcomes this development but regrets that Kajol had to endure being detained for 237 days after being abducted for 53 days, and calls on Dhaka prosecutors to drop all charges against this journalist. —————————————————————————– News BangladeshAsia – Pacific Protecting journalistsProtecting sources DisappearancesImprisonedJudicial harassment February 22, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

May 31

Homeowner Needs After Wildfires Fall Short of Expectations

first_img Previous: Can 2017’s Mighty Construction Numbers Keep Rolling in 2018? Next: Mulvaney Requests Zero Funding for CFPB in Q2  Print This Post Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago More than 4,000 households ravaged by the wildfires in Sonoma county, California in October 2017, were eligible for government-provided temporary public housing. Of these only 184 are currently living in a direct housing option such as manufacturing housing units, recreational vehicles, or in directly leased units, according to statistics released by the Department of Homeland Security (FEMA). The statistics also revealed that eight joint local assistance centers and disaster recovery centers were set up to provide face-to-face disaster assistance for the 16,653 survivors.Low-interest disaster loans from the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) is also available with  SBA having approved 927 loan applications from homeowners and 110 applications from business owners. Despite these steps, the demand for government provided housing is low in the county as many displaced residents find accommodations through their friends and family or through their insurance companies.According to an article published by The Press Democrat,  Robert Presapane, Division Supervisor, Sonoma County for FEMA has said that more than two-thirds of the 3,200 applicants had found new accommodations on their own. “The fire victims seeking housing from FEMA represent less than 6 percent of those the agency found so far compared to a historical norm of around 10 percent from other disasters,” Presapane said.FEMA had housed 82 applicants at the fairgrounds site in southeast Santa Rosa and had nearly 40 more RV spots available there. Another 53 applicants were being housed by FEMA in apartments.The article said that federal and local officials acknowledged that the housing need could still evolve. “FEMA had not been able to reach 580 housing-eligible applicants through multiple phone calls, possibly reflecting some fire victims who registered for government aid assistance and then decided they didn’t require it,” Presapane said. Home / Daily Dose / Homeowner Needs After Wildfires Fall Short of Expectations Related Articles Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily center_img Tagged with: California FEMA Homes HOUSING sonoma temporary housing wildfire Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Homeowner Needs After Wildfires Fall Short of Expectations January 18, 2018 1,329 Views in Daily Dose, Featured, Government, News Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago California FEMA Homes HOUSING sonoma temporary housing wildfire 2018-01-18 Staff Writer Share Save Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Subscribelast_img read more

May 7

Don’t let landlords rely on old EPCs

first_imgHome » News » Don’t let landlords rely on old EPCs previous nextRegulation & LawDon’t let landlords rely on old EPCsCarter Jonas says EPCs must be reviewed now they’re required for rental property tooThe Negotiator6th December 20160766 Views Residential landlords would be well advised to take the 10-year anniversary of the introduction of Energy Performance Certificates or EPCs as a spur to get their properties properly reassessed, says Lisa Simons at Carter Jonas.A new EPC could make the difference between 10 years of worry-free letting and a whole lot of stress.Intended to last for a decade and required before homes could be sold or let, EPCs have taken on more significance since they became a guiding factor in whether or not a home could be let. Originally part of the Home Information Pack (HIP), the EPC survived when the HIP requirement was abandoned in 2010.The more recent Minimum Energy Efficiency Standards (MEES) mean that from April, 2018, it will be difficult, but not impossible, to let a property with an Energy Efficiency Standard on its EPC below Band E. Exemptions can be registered but are subject to re-application every five years, with no certainty that this regime will continue.“With that in mind, it could be beneficial to review the EPC for your property even if you are not yet required to replace the original purchased 10 years ago,” believes Lisa Simon, Head of Residential Lettings at Carter Jonas. “Some landlords still rely on the EPC existing from when they purchased the property, and therefore provided by the vendor rather than themselves.“Particularly where a property is Band F or G, but also for those with a low score in Band E, having a new EPC assessment could make all the difference between 10 years of worry-free letting and the stress of not knowing whether or not an exemption granted in time for April, 2018, will be renewable in 2023.”Energy Efficiency Rating Energy Performance Certificate Environmental Impact Reading EPC December 6, 2016The NegotiatorWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021last_img read more