June 12

Storms Filled 37 Percent of State’s Snow-Water Deficit, JPL-Assisted Research Shows

first_imgScience and Technology Storms Filled 37 Percent of State’s Snow-Water Deficit, JPL-Assisted Research Shows Published on Monday, January 30, 2017 | 7:22 pm Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena First Heatwave Expected Next Week Community News Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Make a comment Business News Top of the News Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. More Cool Stuff Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website center_img 0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it These maps show how much water was stored in the Sierra snowpack on Jan. 6 (left) and Jan. 24 (center), 2017. Darker colors indicate more water. The inset bar graph in the center figure shows the annual snowpack water storage relative to the pre-drought average as well as the cumulative snow-water deficit. The map on right shows snowpack water storage on Jan. 24 as a percentage of pre-drought average snowpack water storage at its greatest. Areas in green are over 100 percent of average. Credit: CU/NASAResearchers from the University of Colorado Boulder, using computer models developed with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, NASA space imagery and ground-sensor data from the California Department of Water Resources in Sacramento, have come up with an estimate of how much water two recent powerful storms in the state have dumped on the Sierra Nevada range in January.From the estimate, the researchers now say the storms, part of the “atmospheric river” weather patterns that pummeled the state from late December to late January, may have recouped 37 percent of California’s five-year snow-water deficit.Snow-water deficit is the deficit in water stored in snowpack in the mountains now compared with the annual average water stored before the drought began in 2012.On average, the state experienced a snow-water deficit of approximately 10.8-million acre feet per year during the drought years of 2012 through 2016. The total deficit over that five-year period is roughly 54 million acre feet. The recent storms appear to have reduced that total by roughly 37 percent in less than one month, the researchers say.“Early in the January storm cycle, lower mountain elevations received some rain, but the vast majority of the mountain precipitation has come as snow – which is exactly the way we need this precipitation,” Thomas Painter, a snow scientist at JPL, and principal investigator of NASA’s Airborne Snow Observatory, said. “As snow, it releases to reservoirs and ecosystems more gradually and efficiently over the summer months.”Noah Molotch, a JPL research scientist who heads the University of Colorado Boulder’s Center for Water Earth Science and Technology (CWEST) and leader of the study, cautioned that there is still a long way to go before California makes up its snow-water deficit completely.“When the snow stopped falling five years ago, the state had to tap into its groundwater reserves to keep up,” Molotch said. “One snowy winter won’t be able to entirely reverse that, but there is, at least, some cautious optimism.”Molotch also indicated that the recent storms also brought some flood risk although it did bring much-needed snow.“The concern moving forward relates to what happens with the weather for the rest of the winter,” said Molotch. “Reservoirs across the Sierra foothills are now relatively full. If we get another intense atmospheric river with warmer air temperatures, that could lead to melting of the snowpack, and the risk for rain-induced flooding is considerable.”David Rizzardo, chief of Snow Surveys and Water Supply Forecasting for the California Department of Water Resources, said the start of winter has been the best California has seen since 2011.“It gives water managers hope for relief from what has been a historically dry five-year period,” Rizzardo said.The Department will now use the JPL and CWEST data to fine-tune vital seasonal runoff estimates, used by water managers and reservoir operators across the state. Results of the most recent snow survey will be released on February 2, the Department said. Subscribe Community News EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Herbeauty10 Of The Most Notorious Female Spies In HistoryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyA Dark Side Of Beauty Salons Not Many People Know AboutHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyNutritional Strategies To Ease AnxietyHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty9 Of The Best Family Friendly Dog BreedsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyStop Eating Read Meat (Before It’s Too Late)HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyShort On Time? 10-Minute Workouts Are Just What You NeedHerbeautyHerbeauty faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimeslast_img read more

June 12

Pasadena Area Assemblymember Holden’s Teacher Tax Credit Bill Passes Revenue and Taxation Committee

first_imgHome of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Community News More Cool Stuff Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Subscribe Make a comment faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPasadena Water and PowerPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Community News Government Pasadena Area Assemblymember Holden’s Teacher Tax Credit Bill Passes Revenue and Taxation Committee Legislation to Commemorate 100th Anniversary of Route 66 Passes First Policy Committee Published on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 | 2:09 pmcenter_img 13 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Herbeauty10 Most Influential Women In HistoryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyNutritional Strategies To Ease AnxietyHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThis Trend Looks Kind Of Cool!HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyTop 9 Predicted Haircut Trends Of 2020HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyIs It Bad To Give Your Boyfriend An Ultimatum?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyTop Important Things You Never Knew About MicrobladingHerbeautyHerbeauty First Heatwave Expected Next Week Business News Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Pasadena area Assemblymember Chris Holden’s legislation to address California’s teacher shortage, Assembly Bill 586, passed the Assembly Committee on Revenue and Taxation. Specifically, AB 586 would allow newly-credentialed teachers either an individual tax credit or deduction for professional development expenses to fulfill the requirements for a California Clear Multiple, Single Subjects Credential or Special Education (Education Specialist Instruction) Credential.California’s shortage of professionally qualified teachers directly impacts the quality of our children’s education,” said Assemblymember Chris Holden. “Tax relief can encourage new teachers to remain in the profession.”Expenses pose a particular hardship for many new teachers who serve at the lowest end of salary scales, while still paying off their college loans. In a 2016 survey by the Learning Policy Institute of more than 200 California school districts, 75% were experiencing teacher shortages, and the vast majority was getting worse.Holden’s legislation that would establish the Route 66 Centennial Commission to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the California Historic State Route 66 passed the Assembly Transportation Committee with a 13-0 vote.“This bill helps preserve the rich cultural and political history of Route 66 and will bring back lively tourism to cities, museums and vintage California monuments along the route,” said Holden.Holden’s legislation to establish a storm water compliance fund and increases the California Tire Fee to raise revenue for water treatment, Assembly Bill 1180, passed the Assembly Natural Resources Committee with 7-3 vote. Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Top of the News last_img read more