May 9

Ice and snow thickness variability and change in the high Arctic Ocean observed by in-situ measurements

first_imgIn April 2017 we collected unique, extensive in-situ data of sea ice and snow thickness. At ten sampling sites, located under a CryoSat-2 overpass, between Ellesmere Island and 87.1°N mean and modal total ice thicknesses ranged between 2 to 3.4 m and 1.8 to 2.9 m respectively. Coincident snow thicknesses ranged between 0.3 to 0.47 m (mean), and 0.1 to 0.5 m (mode). The profile spanned the complete multiyear ice zone in the Lincoln Sea, into the first-year ice zone further north. Complementary snow thickness measurements near the North Pole showed a mean thickness of 0.31 m. Compared with scarce measurements from other years, multiyear ice was up to 0.75 m thinner than in 2004, but not significantly different from 2011 and 2014. We found excellent agreement with a commonly used snow climatology and with published long-term ice thinning rates. There was reasonable agreement with CryoSat-2 thickness retrievalslast_img read more

September 8

Sarita Devi contracts COVID-19, takes heart from cancer-battling Dingko who beat virus

first_img 4 months ago I went into depression for being unable to resume my treatment: Dingko Singh 4 months ago Vijender, Manoj help raise funds for ailing Dingko Singh SUBSCRIBE TO US Written By Last Updated: 18th August, 2020 12:38 IST Sarita Devi Contracts COVID-19, Takes Heart From Cancer-battling Dingko Who Beat Virus Boxer Laishram Sarita Devi, who contracted COVID-19, is taking inspiration from champion boxer Dingko Singh, who beat COVID-19 while battling cancer. Asian Games and Commonwealth Games medallist Laishram Sarita Devi and her husband, Thoiba Singh, tested positive for COVID-19 on Monday. The 38-year-old boxer and her husband were in her hometown in Imphal, Manipur and decided to take a test after Devi was running a fever and had a cold for three days. The couple has been shifted to a government-run COVID-19 care centre at UNACCO School in the West Imphal district, where they will be observed for a fortnight. Also read | Sarita Devi to represent India at AIBA’s Athlete Commission: Sports newsSarita Devi COVID-19 test in Imphal comes back positiveWhile talking to Indian Express, Sarita Devi revealed that she was “suffering from fever apart from soreness in the body” and a “light cold”. Her symptoms started after she visited her brother’s home, where she helped their family after his wife gave birth. They initially thought she had muscle cramps but decided to get tested. While she and her husband tested positive, her eight-year-old son Tomthil, cousin sister and her daughter tested negative. Devi is a three-time world champion and a five-time Asian medalist who was a part of the Athletes’ Commission of the International Boxing Association in 2019. Also read | Vijender, Manoj help raise funds for ailing Dingko Singh: Sports newsSarita Devi taking inspiration from Dingko Singh, who beat COVID-19 despite battling cancerTwo months ago, 1998 Asian Games boxing champion Dingko Singh tested positive for COVID-19. Devi helped Dingko Singh and his wife Babai Devi travel to Delhi. Devi remained in touch with him after they returned to Imphal. During her interview, Devi revealed that Dingko was one of the first people she talked to after her diagnosis was confirmed. “Dingko sir recovered from COVID-19 while battling cancer. He talked to me and assured me that everything will be fine,” Sarita Devi added. Before leaving for her treatment, Devi told her son not to worry about her and his father, and keep himself occupied by reading books. They are aware of the recovery stories through newspapers and other forms of media and expect to recover as the Indian hockey team players did. They are being given medicines to reduce fever, while she talks to her son over the phone to keep herself occupied. “There should not be any stigma around COVID-19 patients. But on the other hand, we should follow all the precautions,” Devi said.Also read | I went into depression for being unable to resume my treatment: Dingko SinghSarita Devi boxing careerThe boxing champion wants to get back to her training, as she has now moved to a lower weight category. Before the Olympic qualifiers in Jordan, the Manipur native was defeated by Simranjit Kaur in the 60kg category. Kaur qualified for the Olympics, and Devi will be trying to qualify in the 57kg qualifiers for the Tokyo Olympics in 2021. While the national camp for Indian women boxers remains on hiatus, Devi will resume her training from home after recovery. She also added that in the 57kg category, her height will prove to be an advantage. “I had been training at my home since March and once full training resumes, my focus will be on fast feet movement, which will be a key in this new category,” Devi explained.Also read | Boxer Sarita Devi to take call on retirement after Tokyo Olympics: Sarita Devi boxing(Image credits: PTI) WATCH US LIVE 11 months ago Boxer Sarita Devi to take call on retirement after Tokyo Olympics LIVE TV WE RECOMMEND Devika Pawar FOLLOW US 11 months ago Wrestler Sarita Devi says ‘I’m not finished yet’, vows comeback 9 months ago Sarita Devi to represent India at AIBA’s Athlete Commission First Published: 18th August, 2020 12:38 IST COMMENTlast_img read more

August 4

‘Patriot Church’ Celebrates Long History of Service to the Community

first_imgBy John BurtonMIDDLETOWN – Imagine what life was like 325 years ago in the area that is now Middletown.It’s a wilderness with a few small pockets of settlers, looking to carve out a life in the New Word. In that frontier setting there is a communal center to the area, the church. It’s a church that still exists today, continuing its mission to offer spiritual and community support.Elaine Lent, church moderator and historian, and Board of Trustees Chairman Peter Ahern, stand in front of the historic Old First Church, Middletown’s oldest church, as they prepare for the Baptist church’s 325th anniversary on Oct. 6.Old First Church, 69 Kings Highway, is celebrating its 325th anniversary Sunday, Oct. 6, with programs, including costumed tours of the historic site, a morning worship service with the church’s pastor, the Rev. Joyce A. Phipps, and a 7 p.m. candlelit community concert of music by early American composers. The musical program will be performed by Glenn May from the Mon­mouth County Historical Association, who will be wearing 18th-century dress and playing the church’s 700-pipe Fritszche organ.The program also will offer some historical notes about the lives of early county residents.A point of pride for the church is its long history of patriotic fervor shown by its members. That is especially true of some of its earliest congregants, including clergy members, who were quick to support the call of liberty and revolution in the 18th century, said Elaine Lent, the church’s moderator – the lay leader – who also serves as the church historian.Middletown’s Old First Church’s cemetery, decorated in American flags for its 325thanniversary, contains the remains of many church members going back to its earliest years.In honor of the church’s participation in the nation’s history, members have placed 400 small American flags around the church buildings and along the outline of its 150-plot cemetery, which contains the graves of some of its original members.Founded in 1688, it was the first church and meeting house in the Middletown area, though personal diaries and records show worshippers had met in each other’s homes as early as 1668, according to Lent.The founders were early settlers arriving here from Massachusetts and what is now the Gravesend section of Brooklyn, N.Y. They landed in the area of what is now Atlantic Highlands and made their way inland.Old First Church, on Kings Highway in Middletown, is decorated with 400 American flags in preparation of the church’s 325th anniversary on Oct. 6.Like many of those who traveled to the Colonies, the earliest church members were seeking freedom from the religious intolerance they found elsewhere. The Baptist sect was relatively new at that time. “So new that there was a number of schisms,” within, Lent said. Being new and often misunderstood, the church was dismissed or derided by other denominations. One of the church’s early clergy members, Obadiah Holmes, was horsewhipped in Boston for his beliefs, Lent said.Even though it is a Baptist denomination, the church attracted those of other faiths, including Episcopal­ian and Quakers.“It was what I would say were a bunch of free thinkers,” who saw the church’s mission as one dedicated to freedom of conscious, soul liberty and respect for diversity, beliefs that still hold true today, Lent said.By the time of Revolu­tionary War, the church had become known as the “Patriot Church” under its pastor, Abel Morgan, who served there until his death in 1785. Morgan was “a very charismatic, intelligent minster,” known for his debating skills, having traveled as far away as Oyster Bay, Long Island, and Staten Island, N.Y., to preach.“He took this very divided congregation and united it,” Lent said.Morgan’s writings show he was an early supporter of the Colonists, looking to break away from England, Lent said.There was certainly a division between the British and the Anglican Church and the relatively upstart Baptist denomination with Anglicans and their Tory supporters having little regard for other faiths, she said.Joseph Murray, a church member, who owned a Middletown farm, was killed fighting the British in 1780, and is buried in the church’s graveyard.Pictured is a drawing of Abel Morgan, Old First Church’s pastor at the time of the American Revolution, with a pair of his eyeglasses and pocket Bible.Around the time of the Battle of Monmouth in Freehold in June 1778, British troops took control of the church, using it either as a field hospital or to house soldiers, according to Lent, who said the information on that is somewhat vague.Morgan was unable to preach there, his services relegated to his farm’s barn, located about a mile away.Following that period “the church just grew like mad,” with its congregation swelling to its high point of about 500 members in the late 1880s, Lent said.Since then, the church has seen some of its members leave and start other Baptist churches in the area, including in Matawan, Holm­del and Atlantic Highlands. About 14 area churches were formed directly from Old First Church, Lent said.The church that sits at the Kings Highway location is the congregation’s third. The first burned down in 1734 and was rebuilt immediately. The existing structure was built in 1832 by members who volunteer their time, funds, lumber and equipment for the task.Over the years there have been expansions and renovations, including moving the former Middletown Women’s Christian Temper­ance Union Hall to the property in 1921, where it is still used as a social hall.After all these years, Old First Church continues to be a center of community involvement and a source of spiritual guidance for its congregants, Lent said.Pictured is a tree showing the numerous area churches that spun off of Old First Church, Middletown’s oldest church.In the aftermath of Super Storm Sandy last October, Old First Church, like a great many houses of worship, remained open and available, allowing the public to come and use the gas-operated stoves to cook meals, and its hot water to wash clothes and themselves when so many were without power for so long.“Churches are some of the few places to handle things like that, because of their size,” making them oftentimes ideal community focal points, Lent said.This summer the church hosted 39 youth and disaster assistance workers from Upstate New York who spent time in Monmouth County working to restore homes for families still recovering from Sandy’s effects.That’s a role the church has always played and continues to take pride in, Lent noted.“As a community church it is dedicated to community efforts,” and continues to host organizations, conduct its own programs and work with the efforts of other community groups.Old First Church now has a diverse membership of about 40 to 50 families. “We have people from all over Monmouth County,” who attend services and participate in programs, said Peter Ahern, chairman of the board of trustees.But some things don’t change with time.“Community was always the heart of this church,” Lent said. “It still is.”last_img read more

August 3

Wildcats drop into consolation round following playoff loss to Highland

first_imgThe Mount Sentinel Wildcats meet Revelstoke Friday in consolation round action at the B.C. High School AA Boy’s Volleyball Championships in Kelowna.The Cats, finishing third in power pool play, lost 3-0 (25-15, 25-15, 25-8) to Highland of Comox during Thursday’s playoff round.Mount Sentinel opened the 16-team tourney Wednesday with losses to Pacific Christian and Kelowna’s Okanagan Mission.The Wildcats bounced back to defeat Kootenay rival Selkirk Storm of Kimberley 2-0 (25-20, 25-22).Friday a victory over Revelstoke earns the Wildcats a chance to climb up the final standings with a shot at ninth place.The Cats would meet the winner of Okanagan Mission and Richmond’s Cambie.The tournament is being held at the University of B.C./Okanagan gymnasium.The finals are set for Saturday at UBC/O.The Mount Sentinel girl’s varsity squad is playing at the B.C. High School A Girl’s Volleyball Tournament in Prince George.last_img read more